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postgraduate thesis: Cognitive processes in social anxiety: a study of anticipatory processing, attentional biases and post-eventprocessing

TitleCognitive processes in social anxiety: a study of anticipatory processing, attentional biases and post-eventprocessing
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)
Citation
Chan, C. [陳皓宜]. (2011). Cognitive processes in social anxiety : a study of anticipatory processing, attentional biases and post-event processing. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4765690
AbstractCognitive models of social phobia (Clark & Wells, 1995; Rapee & Heimberg, 1997) theorize that the dysfunctional cognitive processes maintain the fear people with social anxiety have in social situations. Research has shown that there are three stages of cognitive processes that contribute to social anxiety: anticipatory processing, in-situation processing, and post-event processing. This study investigated differences in these three cognitive processes between 252 individuals with high and low social anxiety in Hong Kong. Study 1 developed Chinese-language self-report measures of anticipatory processing by translating two English measures. It also investigated anticipatory processing questionnaires in terms of internal consistency, factor structure, and concurrent validity. It further examined differences in anticipatory processing between the two groups. The Chinese versions of the two measures of anticipatory processing—the Anticipatory Processing Questionnaire (APQ) and the Measure of Mental Anticipation Processes (MMAP)—showed good to excellent psychometric properties. The factor structure of the Chinese APQ was consistent with the original version (Vassilopoulos, 2004). The MMAP was best explained by two factors, as opposed to the original four. Results from the surveys indicated that individuals with high social anxiety were more likely to engage in maladaptive anticipatory processing. Study 2 experimentally induced distraction, positive, and negative anticipatory processing in sixty-three participants with high and low social anxiety who then gave an impromptu speech. The effects of processing style on anxiety, confidence, and cognitive processing during the speech (self-focused attention) were measured. Positive anticipatory processing increased confidence before the speech for both high and low socially anxious groups, whereas negative anticipatory processing decreased confidence. There was no significant effect of processing manipulation on anxiety. Negative anticipatory processing led to marginally higher scores on the Self-focus Attention subscale of the Focus of Attention Questionnaire (FAQ). Furthermore, people with high social anxiety were found to be more likely than their low socially anxious counterparts to engage in self-focused attention and post-event processing. These findings give evidence that high and low socially anxious individuals differ in anticipatory processing, self-focused attention, and post-event processing. Furthermore, positive anticipatory processing increases confidence before social situations, but fails to reduce anxiety. This contributes to the understanding of differences in cognitive processing between individuals with high and low social anxiety.
DegreeDoctor of Psychology
SubjectSocial phobia - China - Hong Kong.
Dept/ProgramClinical Psychology

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Cindy.-
dc.contributor.author陳皓宜.-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationChan, C. [陳皓宜]. (2011). Cognitive processes in social anxiety : a study of anticipatory processing, attentional biases and post-event processing. (Thesis). University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam, Hong Kong SAR. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.5353/th_b4765690-
dc.description.abstractCognitive models of social phobia (Clark & Wells, 1995; Rapee & Heimberg, 1997) theorize that the dysfunctional cognitive processes maintain the fear people with social anxiety have in social situations. Research has shown that there are three stages of cognitive processes that contribute to social anxiety: anticipatory processing, in-situation processing, and post-event processing. This study investigated differences in these three cognitive processes between 252 individuals with high and low social anxiety in Hong Kong. Study 1 developed Chinese-language self-report measures of anticipatory processing by translating two English measures. It also investigated anticipatory processing questionnaires in terms of internal consistency, factor structure, and concurrent validity. It further examined differences in anticipatory processing between the two groups. The Chinese versions of the two measures of anticipatory processing—the Anticipatory Processing Questionnaire (APQ) and the Measure of Mental Anticipation Processes (MMAP)—showed good to excellent psychometric properties. The factor structure of the Chinese APQ was consistent with the original version (Vassilopoulos, 2004). The MMAP was best explained by two factors, as opposed to the original four. Results from the surveys indicated that individuals with high social anxiety were more likely to engage in maladaptive anticipatory processing. Study 2 experimentally induced distraction, positive, and negative anticipatory processing in sixty-three participants with high and low social anxiety who then gave an impromptu speech. The effects of processing style on anxiety, confidence, and cognitive processing during the speech (self-focused attention) were measured. Positive anticipatory processing increased confidence before the speech for both high and low socially anxious groups, whereas negative anticipatory processing decreased confidence. There was no significant effect of processing manipulation on anxiety. Negative anticipatory processing led to marginally higher scores on the Self-focus Attention subscale of the Focus of Attention Questionnaire (FAQ). Furthermore, people with high social anxiety were found to be more likely than their low socially anxious counterparts to engage in self-focused attention and post-event processing. These findings give evidence that high and low socially anxious individuals differ in anticipatory processing, self-focused attention, and post-event processing. Furthermore, positive anticipatory processing increases confidence before social situations, but fails to reduce anxiety. This contributes to the understanding of differences in cognitive processing between individuals with high and low social anxiety.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherThe University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hong Kong)-
dc.relation.ispartofHKU Theses Online (HKUTO)-
dc.rightsThe author retains all proprietary rights, (such as patent rights) and the right to use in future works.-
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.source.urihttp://hub.hku.hk/bib/B47656906-
dc.subject.lcshSocial phobia - China - Hong Kong.-
dc.titleCognitive processes in social anxiety: a study of anticipatory processing, attentional biases and post-eventprocessing-
dc.typePG_Thesis-
dc.identifier.hkulb4765690-
dc.description.thesisnameDoctor of Psychology-
dc.description.thesislevelDoctoral-
dc.description.thesisdisciplineClinical Psychology-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5353/th_b4765690-
dc.date.hkucongregation2011-

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