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Conference Paper: Neuroanatomical correlates of phonological processing of Chinese characters and alphabetic words: A meta-analysis

TitleNeuroanatomical correlates of phonological processing of Chinese characters and alphabetic words: A meta-analysis
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751
Citation
Human Brain Mapping, 2005, v. 25 n. 1, p. 83-91 How to Cite?
AbstractWe used the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) method to quantitatively synthesize data from 19 published brain mapping studies of phonological processing in reading, six with Chinese and 13 with alphabetic languages. It demonstrated high concordance of cortical activity across multiple studies in each written language system as well as significant differences of activation likelihood between languages. Four neural systems for the phonological processing of Chinese characters included: (1) a left dorsal lateral frontal system at Brodmann area (BA) 9; (2) the dorsal aspect of left inferior parietal system; (3) a bilateral ventral-occipitotemporal system including portions of fusiform gyrus and middle occipital gyms; and (4) a left ventral prefrontal system covering the superior aspect of inferior frontal gyrus. For phonological processing of written alphabetic words, cortical areas identified here are consistent with the three neural systems proposed previously in the literature: (1) a ventral prefrontal system involving superior portions of left inferior frontal gyrus; (2) a left dorsal temporoparietal system including mid-superior temporal gyri and the ventral aspect of inferior parietal cortex (supramarginal region); and (3) a left ventral occipitotemporal system. Contributions of each of these systems to phonological processing in reading were discussed, and a covariant learning hypothesis is offered to account for the findings that left middle frontal gyrus is responsible for addressed phonology in Chinese whereas left temporoparietal regions mediate assembled phonology in alphabetic languages. Language form, cognitive process, and learning strategy drive the development of functional neuroanatomy. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179871
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.962
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.165
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaird, ARen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorFox, PTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:07:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:07:13Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationHuman Brain Mapping, 2005, v. 25 n. 1, p. 83-91en_US
dc.identifier.issn1065-9471en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179871-
dc.description.abstractWe used the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) method to quantitatively synthesize data from 19 published brain mapping studies of phonological processing in reading, six with Chinese and 13 with alphabetic languages. It demonstrated high concordance of cortical activity across multiple studies in each written language system as well as significant differences of activation likelihood between languages. Four neural systems for the phonological processing of Chinese characters included: (1) a left dorsal lateral frontal system at Brodmann area (BA) 9; (2) the dorsal aspect of left inferior parietal system; (3) a bilateral ventral-occipitotemporal system including portions of fusiform gyrus and middle occipital gyms; and (4) a left ventral prefrontal system covering the superior aspect of inferior frontal gyrus. For phonological processing of written alphabetic words, cortical areas identified here are consistent with the three neural systems proposed previously in the literature: (1) a ventral prefrontal system involving superior portions of left inferior frontal gyrus; (2) a left dorsal temporoparietal system including mid-superior temporal gyri and the ventral aspect of inferior parietal cortex (supramarginal region); and (3) a left ventral occipitotemporal system. Contributions of each of these systems to phonological processing in reading were discussed, and a covariant learning hypothesis is offered to account for the findings that left middle frontal gyrus is responsible for addressed phonology in Chinese whereas left temporoparietal regions mediate assembled phonology in alphabetic languages. Language form, cognitive process, and learning strategy drive the development of functional neuroanatomy. © 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Brain Mappingen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBrain Mapping - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshMeta-Analysis As Topicen_US
dc.subject.meshMultilingualismen_US
dc.subject.meshPattern Recognition, Visual - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshPhotic Stimulation - Methodsen_US
dc.subject.meshReadingen_US
dc.subject.meshSpeech - Physiologyen_US
dc.titleNeuroanatomical correlates of phonological processing of Chinese characters and alphabetic words: A meta-analysisen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hbm.20134en_US
dc.identifier.pmid15846817-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-18544362225en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-18544362225&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume25en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage83en_US
dc.identifier.epage91en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000228759600008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLaird, AR=7004999301en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, K=7404988712en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFox, PT=7402680249en_US

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