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Article: Viral reassortment as an information exchange between viral segments

TitleViral reassortment as an information exchange between viral segments
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.org
Citation
Proceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2012, v. 109 n. 9, p. 3341-3346 How to Cite?
AbstractViruses have an extraordinary ability to diversify and evolve. For segmented viruses, reassortment can introduce drastic genomic and phenotypic changes by allowing a direct exchange of genetic material between coinfecting strains. For instance, multiple influenza pandemics were caused by reassortments of viruses typically found in separate hosts. What is unclear, however, are the underlying mechanisms driving these events and the level of intrinsic bias in the diversity of strains that emerge from coinfection. To address this problem, previous experiments looked for correlations between segments of strains that coinfect cells in vitro. Here, we present an information theory approach as the natural mathematical framework for this question. We study, for influenza and other segmented viruses, the extent to which a virus's segments can communicate strain information across an infection and among one another. Our approach goes beyond previous association studies and quantifies how much the diversity of emerging strains is altered by patterns in reassortment, whether biases are consistent across multiple strains and cell types, and if significant information is shared among more than two segments. We apply our approach to a new experiment that examines reassortment patterns between the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and seasonal H1N1 strains, contextualizing its segmental information sharing by comparison with previously reported strain reassortments. We find evolutionary patterns across classes of experiments and previously unobserved higher-level structures. Finally, we show how this approach can be combined with virulence potentials to assess pandemic threats.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179835
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 9.423
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.883
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGreenbaum, BDen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, OTWen_US
dc.contributor.authorPoon, LLMen_US
dc.contributor.authorLevine, AJen_US
dc.contributor.authorRabadan, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:05:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:05:18Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America, 2012, v. 109 n. 9, p. 3341-3346en_US
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179835-
dc.description.abstractViruses have an extraordinary ability to diversify and evolve. For segmented viruses, reassortment can introduce drastic genomic and phenotypic changes by allowing a direct exchange of genetic material between coinfecting strains. For instance, multiple influenza pandemics were caused by reassortments of viruses typically found in separate hosts. What is unclear, however, are the underlying mechanisms driving these events and the level of intrinsic bias in the diversity of strains that emerge from coinfection. To address this problem, previous experiments looked for correlations between segments of strains that coinfect cells in vitro. Here, we present an information theory approach as the natural mathematical framework for this question. We study, for influenza and other segmented viruses, the extent to which a virus's segments can communicate strain information across an infection and among one another. Our approach goes beyond previous association studies and quantifies how much the diversity of emerging strains is altered by patterns in reassortment, whether biases are consistent across multiple strains and cell types, and if significant information is shared among more than two segments. We apply our approach to a new experiment that examines reassortment patterns between the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and seasonal H1N1 strains, contextualizing its segmental information sharing by comparison with previously reported strain reassortments. We find evolutionary patterns across classes of experiments and previously unobserved higher-level structures. Finally, we show how this approach can be combined with virulence potentials to assess pandemic threats.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.pnas.orgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of Americaen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Line - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCoinfectionen_US
dc.subject.meshDogsen_US
dc.subject.meshEntropyen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H1n1 Subtype - Genetics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H3n2 Subtype - Genetics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H7n7 Subtype - Genetics - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshKidneyen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshReassortant Viruses - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshRecombination, Genetic - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshVirus Replicationen_US
dc.titleViral reassortment as an information exchange between viral segmentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPoon, LLM: llmpoon@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPoon, LLM=rp00484en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1113300109en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22331898-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84857727931en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros203688-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84857727931&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume109en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage3341en_US
dc.identifier.epage3346en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000300828200035-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGreenbaum, BD=34770652600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, OTW=16230718400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPoon, LLM=7005441747en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLevine, AJ=35400716600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRabadan, R=15071174300en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike11081144-

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