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Article: Looking for avian influenza in remote areas. A case study in Northern Vietnam

TitleLooking for avian influenza in remote areas. A case study in Northern Vietnam
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/actatropica
Citation
Acta Tropica, 2011, v. 120 n. 3, p. 160-166 How to Cite?
AbstractEpidemiological surveys of avian influenza infections rarely focus on backyard poultry systems in remote locations because areas with low levels of poultry production are considered to have little influence on the emergence, re-emergence, persistence or spread of avian influenza viruses. In addition, routine disease investigations in remote areas often are neglected due to the lower availability and relatively high cost of veterinary services there. A bank of avian sera collected in 2005 from ethnic minority households in Ha Giang province (Northern Vietnam), located on the Chinese border, was analysed to estimate the seroprevalence of avian influenza virus (AIV) during a H5N1 epidemic and to identify potential risk factors for infection. The results suggest that the chicken population had been exposed to AIV with a seroprevalence rate of 7.2% [1.45; 10.5]. The H5 and H9 subtypes were identified with a seroprevalence of 3.25% [2.39; 4.11] and 1.12% [0.61; 1.63], respectively. The number of inhabitants in a village and the distance to the main national road were the most influential risk factors of AIV infection, and high-risk clusters were located along the road leading to China. These two results suggest a virus spread through commercial poultry exchanges and a possible introduction of AIV from southern China. Remote areas and small-scale farms may play an under-estimated role in the spread and persistence of AIV. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179832
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.38
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.059
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTrevennec, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorChevalier, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorGrosbois, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorThu, HHen_US
dc.contributor.authorBerthoulySalazar, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoger, Fen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:05:16Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:05:16Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationActa Tropica, 2011, v. 120 n. 3, p. 160-166en_US
dc.identifier.issn0001-706Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179832-
dc.description.abstractEpidemiological surveys of avian influenza infections rarely focus on backyard poultry systems in remote locations because areas with low levels of poultry production are considered to have little influence on the emergence, re-emergence, persistence or spread of avian influenza viruses. In addition, routine disease investigations in remote areas often are neglected due to the lower availability and relatively high cost of veterinary services there. A bank of avian sera collected in 2005 from ethnic minority households in Ha Giang province (Northern Vietnam), located on the Chinese border, was analysed to estimate the seroprevalence of avian influenza virus (AIV) during a H5N1 epidemic and to identify potential risk factors for infection. The results suggest that the chicken population had been exposed to AIV with a seroprevalence rate of 7.2% [1.45; 10.5]. The H5 and H9 subtypes were identified with a seroprevalence of 3.25% [2.39; 4.11] and 1.12% [0.61; 1.63], respectively. The number of inhabitants in a village and the distance to the main national road were the most influential risk factors of AIV infection, and high-risk clusters were located along the road leading to China. These two results suggest a virus spread through commercial poultry exchanges and a possible introduction of AIV from southern China. Remote areas and small-scale farms may play an under-estimated role in the spread and persistence of AIV. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/actatropicaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofActa Tropicaen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viral - Blooden_US
dc.subject.meshChickensen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus - Classification - Immunology - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza In Birds - Epidemiology - Transmissionen_US
dc.subject.meshSeroepidemiologic Studiesen_US
dc.subject.meshVietnam - Epidemiologyen_US
dc.titleLooking for avian influenza in remote areas. A case study in Northern Vietnamen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.actatropica.2011.07.010en_US
dc.identifier.pmid21840292-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80054856663en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros205807-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80054856663&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume120en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage160en_US
dc.identifier.epage166en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297428400002-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTrevennec, K=48462069700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChevalier, V=25222407500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGrosbois, V=6507134618en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGarcia, JM=16202601400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThu, HH=54390278800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBerthoulySalazar, C=23983930300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRoger, F=7006292417en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9693023-

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