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Article: Avian influenza viruses in humans

TitleAvian influenza viruses in humans
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherOrganisation Mondiale de la Sante Animale (O I E). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oie.int
Citation
Oie Revue Scientifique Et Technique, 2009, v. 28 n. 1, p. 161-174 How to Cite?
AbstractPast pandemics arose from low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses. In more recent times, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1, LPAI H9N2 and both HPAI and LPAI H7 viruses have repeatedly caused zoonotic disease in humans. Such infections did not lead to sustained human-to-human transmission. Experimental infection of human volunteers and seroepidemiological studies suggest that avian influenza viruses of other subtypes may also infect humans. Viruses of the H7 subtype appear to have a predilection to cause conjunctivitis and influenza-like illness (ILI), although HPAI H7N7 virus has also caused fatal respiratory disease. Low pathogenic H9N2 viruses have caused mild ILI and its occurrence may be under-recognised for this reason. In contrast, contemporary HPAI H5N1 viruses are exceptional in their virulence for humans and differ from human seasonal influenza viruses in their pathogenesis. Patients have a primary viral pneumonia progressing to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Over 380 human cases have been confirmed to date, with an overall case fatality of 63%. The zoonotic transmission of avian influenza is a rare occurrence, but the greater public health concern is the adaptation of such viruses to efficient human transmission, which could lead to a pandemic. A better understanding of the ecology of avian influenza viruses and the biological determinants of transmissibility and pathogenicity in humans is important for pandemic preparedness.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179821
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.904
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.546
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:05:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:05:12Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationOie Revue Scientifique Et Technique, 2009, v. 28 n. 1, p. 161-174en_US
dc.identifier.issn0253-1933en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179821-
dc.description.abstractPast pandemics arose from low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses. In more recent times, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1, LPAI H9N2 and both HPAI and LPAI H7 viruses have repeatedly caused zoonotic disease in humans. Such infections did not lead to sustained human-to-human transmission. Experimental infection of human volunteers and seroepidemiological studies suggest that avian influenza viruses of other subtypes may also infect humans. Viruses of the H7 subtype appear to have a predilection to cause conjunctivitis and influenza-like illness (ILI), although HPAI H7N7 virus has also caused fatal respiratory disease. Low pathogenic H9N2 viruses have caused mild ILI and its occurrence may be under-recognised for this reason. In contrast, contemporary HPAI H5N1 viruses are exceptional in their virulence for humans and differ from human seasonal influenza viruses in their pathogenesis. Patients have a primary viral pneumonia progressing to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. Over 380 human cases have been confirmed to date, with an overall case fatality of 63%. The zoonotic transmission of avian influenza is a rare occurrence, but the greater public health concern is the adaptation of such viruses to efficient human transmission, which could lead to a pandemic. A better understanding of the ecology of avian influenza viruses and the biological determinants of transmissibility and pathogenicity in humans is important for pandemic preparedness.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherOrganisation Mondiale de la Sante Animale (O I E). The Journal's web site is located at http://www.oie.inten_US
dc.relation.ispartofOIE Revue Scientifique et Techniqueen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBirdsen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H5n1 Subtype - Pathogenicity - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H7n7 Subtype - Pathogenicity - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza A Virus, H9n2 Subtype - Pathogenicity - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza In Birds - Transmission - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshInfluenza, Human - Epidemiology - Virologyen_US
dc.subject.meshZoonoses - Epidemiology - Virologyen_US
dc.titleAvian influenza viruses in humansen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid19618624-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-68149132263en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-68149132263&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume28en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage161en_US
dc.identifier.epage174en_US
dc.publisher.placeFranceen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_US

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