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Article: Use of antibody avidity assays for diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection

TitleUse of antibody avidity assays for diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infection
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://cdli.asm.org/
Citation
Clinical and Vaccine Immunology, 2007, v. 14 n. 11, p. 1433-1436 How to Cite?
AbstractAn indirect immunofluorescent assay (Euroimmun AG, Luebeck, Germany) was used to investigate the avidity of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, IgA, and total Ig (IgGAM) antibody responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus (SARS CoV) infections. Serial serum samples from eight patients collected during the first, third, and ninth months after the onset of infection were evaluated. It was found that low-avidity IgG antibodies were detected in 15/15 (100%), 1/5 (20%), and 0/8 (0%) serum samples collected during the first, third, and ninth months after the onset of symptoms, respectively. Low-avidity antibodies of IgA and IgM subclasses were detected in 14/14 (100%) and 3/14 (21%) serum samples, respectively, collected in the first month after the onset of infection. However, IgA antibodies remained low in avidity in a proportion of patients even during late convalescence. As a consequence, IgG antibody avidity assays gave better discrimination between acute-phase and late-convalescent-phase serum samples than IgM, IgA, or IgGAM assays. In two of these patients, sequential serum samples were also tested for IgG avidity against human CoV strains OC43 and 229E in parallel. While SARS CoV infections induced an anamnestic IgG antibody response to the 229E and OC43 viruses, these cross-reactive antibodies remained of high avidity from early (the first month) postinfection. The results showed that assays to detect low-avidity antibody may be useful for discriminating early from late antibody responses and also for distinguishing anamnestic cross-reactive antibody responses from primary specific responses. This may be useful in some clinical situations. Copyright © 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179806
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.277
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.329
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KHen_US
dc.contributor.authorSonnenberg, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorNiedrig, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, SYen_US
dc.contributor.authorPang, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KMen_US
dc.contributor.authorMa, SKen_US
dc.contributor.authorSeto, WHen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:04:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:04:59Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationClinical and Vaccine Immunology, 2007, v. 14 n. 11, p. 1433-1436en_US
dc.identifier.issn1556-6811en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179806-
dc.description.abstractAn indirect immunofluorescent assay (Euroimmun AG, Luebeck, Germany) was used to investigate the avidity of immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM, IgA, and total Ig (IgGAM) antibody responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus (SARS CoV) infections. Serial serum samples from eight patients collected during the first, third, and ninth months after the onset of infection were evaluated. It was found that low-avidity IgG antibodies were detected in 15/15 (100%), 1/5 (20%), and 0/8 (0%) serum samples collected during the first, third, and ninth months after the onset of symptoms, respectively. Low-avidity antibodies of IgA and IgM subclasses were detected in 14/14 (100%) and 3/14 (21%) serum samples, respectively, collected in the first month after the onset of infection. However, IgA antibodies remained low in avidity in a proportion of patients even during late convalescence. As a consequence, IgG antibody avidity assays gave better discrimination between acute-phase and late-convalescent-phase serum samples than IgM, IgA, or IgGAM assays. In two of these patients, sequential serum samples were also tested for IgG avidity against human CoV strains OC43 and 229E in parallel. While SARS CoV infections induced an anamnestic IgG antibody response to the 229E and OC43 viruses, these cross-reactive antibodies remained of high avidity from early (the first month) postinfection. The results showed that assays to detect low-avidity antibody may be useful for discriminating early from late antibody responses and also for distinguishing anamnestic cross-reactive antibody responses from primary specific responses. This may be useful in some clinical situations. Copyright © 2007, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society for Microbiology. The Journal's web site is located at http://cdli.asm.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofClinical and Vaccine Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viral - Blood - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAntibody Affinityen_US
dc.subject.meshAntibody Specificityen_US
dc.subject.meshCoronavirus 229E, Human - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCoronavirus Oc43, Human - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirecten_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin A - Blood - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin G - Blood - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin M - Blood - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSars Virus - Immunologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSevere Acute Respiratory Syndrome - Diagnosis - Immunology - Virologyen_US
dc.titleUse of antibody avidity assays for diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus infectionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1128/CVI.00056-07en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17881505-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-37349085740en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros151958-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-37349085740&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage1433en_US
dc.identifier.epage1436en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000251125800007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KH=35338760600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSonnenberg, K=15122949000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNiedrig, M=7003827932en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, SY=23073866700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPang, CM=7201425130en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, KM=26324790600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, SK=35215973500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSeto, WH=7005799377en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_US

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