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Article: Anopheline ecology and malaria infection during the irrigation development of an area of the Mahaweli Project, Sri Lanka

TitleAnopheline ecology and malaria infection during the irrigation development of an area of the Mahaweli Project, Sri Lanka
Authors
Issue Date1991
PublisherAmerican Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajtmh.org/
Citation
American Journal Of Tropical Medicine And Hygiene, 1991, v. 45 n. 2, p. 226-235 How to Cite?
AbstractA study on adult anopheline ecology and malaria vector incrimination was carried out from 1986 to 1989 during irrigation development in an area of the Mahaweli Project in eastern Sri Lanka. Eleven potential vector species were collected resting indoors or by using human or bovid bait, and from light trap catches. Overall, Anopheles vagus (Donitz), An. annularis (van der Wulp), and An. subpictus (Grassi) were the most prevalent, and An. culicifacies (Giles) and An. barbirostris (van der Wulp) were the least prevalent species. The abundance of An. aconitus (Donitz), An. jamesii (Theobald), An. pallidus (Theobald), and An. subpictus increased after irrigation development, while An. annularis, An. barbirostris, An. culicifacies and An. varuna (Iyengar) decreased. Populations of An. nigerrimus (Giles), An. tessellatus (Theobald), and An. vagus did not change substantially. Seven species were infected with malaria parasites, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) done on mosquito head-thorax triturates. The main species involved were An. annularis, at peak abundance during the 1986-1987 period of development leading to the onset of irrigation, and An. subpictus, during times of seasonal abundance in the post-irrigation period of 1988 to 1989. Although occurring at low abundance, An. culicifacies was involved in malaria transmission irregularly throughout the study period. While there was strong ELISA-based evidence implicating An. subpictus as a major post- irrigation vector, confirmation of its vector status must await dissection and ELISA-based evidence of P. vivax and P. falciparum sporozoite infection rates in salivary glands.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179742
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.453
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.488
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAmerasinghe, FPen_US
dc.contributor.authorAmerasinghe, PHen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeiris, JSMen_US
dc.contributor.authorWirtz, RAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:04:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:04:13Z-
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal Of Tropical Medicine And Hygiene, 1991, v. 45 n. 2, p. 226-235en_US
dc.identifier.issn0002-9637en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179742-
dc.description.abstractA study on adult anopheline ecology and malaria vector incrimination was carried out from 1986 to 1989 during irrigation development in an area of the Mahaweli Project in eastern Sri Lanka. Eleven potential vector species were collected resting indoors or by using human or bovid bait, and from light trap catches. Overall, Anopheles vagus (Donitz), An. annularis (van der Wulp), and An. subpictus (Grassi) were the most prevalent, and An. culicifacies (Giles) and An. barbirostris (van der Wulp) were the least prevalent species. The abundance of An. aconitus (Donitz), An. jamesii (Theobald), An. pallidus (Theobald), and An. subpictus increased after irrigation development, while An. annularis, An. barbirostris, An. culicifacies and An. varuna (Iyengar) decreased. Populations of An. nigerrimus (Giles), An. tessellatus (Theobald), and An. vagus did not change substantially. Seven species were infected with malaria parasites, as determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) done on mosquito head-thorax triturates. The main species involved were An. annularis, at peak abundance during the 1986-1987 period of development leading to the onset of irrigation, and An. subpictus, during times of seasonal abundance in the post-irrigation period of 1988 to 1989. Although occurring at low abundance, An. culicifacies was involved in malaria transmission irregularly throughout the study period. While there was strong ELISA-based evidence implicating An. subpictus as a major post- irrigation vector, confirmation of its vector status must await dissection and ELISA-based evidence of P. vivax and P. falciparum sporozoite infection rates in salivary glands.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ajtmh.org/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnopheles - Parasitologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Protozoan - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshCattleen_US
dc.subject.meshEcologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEnzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assayen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshInsect Vectors - Parasitologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMalaria - Parasitology - Transmissionen_US
dc.subject.meshPlasmodium Falciparum - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshPlasmodium Vivax - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Densityen_US
dc.subject.meshProtozoan Proteinsen_US
dc.subject.meshSalivary Glands - Parasitologyen_US
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen_US
dc.subject.meshSri Lankaen_US
dc.titleAnopheline ecology and malaria infection during the irrigation development of an area of the Mahaweli Project, Sri Lankaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPeiris, JSM: malik@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeiris, JSM=rp00410en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid1877717-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0026323606en_US
dc.identifier.volume45en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage226en_US
dc.identifier.epage235en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1991GE34900009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAmerasinghe, FP=7003373377en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAmerasinghe, PH=35585695700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeiris, JSM=7005486823en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWirtz, RA=35821689600en_US

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