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Conference Paper: Instrumental analysis of popular botanical products in the U.S. market

TitleInstrumental analysis of popular botanical products in the U.S. market
Authors
Issue Date2006
Citation
Acs Symposium Series, 2006, v. 925, p. 39-54 How to Cite?
AbstractA large number of botanicals are used in various products including beverages, dietary supplements, foods, healthcare and personal care products. Dietary supplements and functional foods are among the most rapidly growing sectors in the food and personal care products industry. The demand for safe and effective dietary supplement in the US market has grown exponentially and consumers, the government, and the media, which has been a major force in the market, have each begun to seriously question the quality of dietary supplements. Given the consumer-driven nature of the dietary supplements industry and the regulatory framework in the US, the quality control standards for botanical products are still found lacking and/or unevenly implemented, despite major gains achieved by the industry as the private sector seeks to improve quality and meet governmental expectations under the current policy of largely self-regulation. While major accomplishments continue to be achieved by industry to ensure improved quality of the product including packaging, GMP issues, improved labeling clarity, the addition of product expiration dates and claims, and more, for those standardized botanical extracts, many problems still remain. In this paper, we evaluated the quality of popular botanical extracts including artichoke, bilberry, soy any tribulus using HPLC fingerprinting, LC-MS analyses, and other analytical techniques and focus purposefully not on the notable gains in overall quality that have been achieved in the botanical and herbal industry over the last decade but on specific issues relating to the natural product content in botanicals, particularly relative to the products own label claim and standardization. The improvement in quality control and detection of adulteration is also discussed. © 2006 American Chemical Society.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179591
ISSN
2005 Impact Factor: 0.566
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.163
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorLiang, CPen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, QLen_US
dc.contributor.authorSimon, JEen_US
dc.contributor.authorHo, CTen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T10:00:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T10:00:03Z-
dc.date.issued2006en_US
dc.identifier.citationAcs Symposium Series, 2006, v. 925, p. 39-54en_US
dc.identifier.issn0097-6156en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179591-
dc.description.abstractA large number of botanicals are used in various products including beverages, dietary supplements, foods, healthcare and personal care products. Dietary supplements and functional foods are among the most rapidly growing sectors in the food and personal care products industry. The demand for safe and effective dietary supplement in the US market has grown exponentially and consumers, the government, and the media, which has been a major force in the market, have each begun to seriously question the quality of dietary supplements. Given the consumer-driven nature of the dietary supplements industry and the regulatory framework in the US, the quality control standards for botanical products are still found lacking and/or unevenly implemented, despite major gains achieved by the industry as the private sector seeks to improve quality and meet governmental expectations under the current policy of largely self-regulation. While major accomplishments continue to be achieved by industry to ensure improved quality of the product including packaging, GMP issues, improved labeling clarity, the addition of product expiration dates and claims, and more, for those standardized botanical extracts, many problems still remain. In this paper, we evaluated the quality of popular botanical extracts including artichoke, bilberry, soy any tribulus using HPLC fingerprinting, LC-MS analyses, and other analytical techniques and focus purposefully not on the notable gains in overall quality that have been achieved in the botanical and herbal industry over the last decade but on specific issues relating to the natural product content in botanicals, particularly relative to the products own label claim and standardization. The improvement in quality control and detection of adulteration is also discussed. © 2006 American Chemical Society.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofACS Symposium Seriesen_US
dc.titleInstrumental analysis of popular botanical products in the U.S. marketen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailWang, M: mfwang@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWang, M=rp00800en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33751268731en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33751268731&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume925en_US
dc.identifier.spage39en_US
dc.identifier.epage54en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, M=7406691844en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiang, CP=7403280384en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, QL=7404602467en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSimon, JE=7403956069en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHo, CT=7404652573en_US

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