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Conference Paper: Influence of feeding alikaline/heat processed proteins on growth and protein and mineral status of rats

TitleInfluence of feeding alikaline/heat processed proteins on growth and protein and mineral status of rats
Authors
Issue Date1999
Citation
Advances In Experimental Medicine And Biology, 1999, v. 459, p. 161-177 How to Cite?
AbstractEffects of feeding alkaline (0.1 N NaOH) and heat treated (75°C for 3 h) proteins (lactalbumin and soybean protein isolate, SPI) on growth, and protein and mineral status of rats have been determined. The untreated and alkaline/heat treated lactalbumin contained 0.10 and 4.42 g lysinoalanine (LAL)/100 g protein, respectively. Similarly, the untreated and treated SPI contained 0.03 and 1.94 g LAL/100 g protein, respectively. The formation of LAL in the treated proteins was accompanied with a loss of cystine (73-77%), threonine (35-45%), serine (18-30%) and lysine (19-20%). The alkaline/heat treatments caused significant (P < 0.05) reductions in protein digestibility of lactalbumin (99 vs. 73%) and SPI (96 vs. 68%). The processing treatments also caused a drastic negative effect on protein quality, as measured by rat growth methods such as relative protein efficiency ratio (RPER) and relative net protein ratio (RNPR). The RPER and RNPR values of untreated lactalbumin and SPI were 89-91 and 56-64%, respectively. But the RPER and RNPR values of the treated lactalbumin and SPI were 0%. The mineral status of rats was also compromised by feeding alkaline/heat treated proteins. Liver iron levels in male rats (165-180 μg/g dry weight) and female rats (306-321 μg/g dry weight) fed the treated proteins were about half the levels in male rats (229-257 μg/g dry weight) and female rats (578-697 μg/g dry weight) fed the untreated proteins. The kidney iron contents of rats fed the treated proteins were also lower than that of rats fed the untreated proteins. Liver copper levels of male and female rats fed the treated proteins were up to three fold higher than those found in rats fed the untreated proteins. The data suggested that LAL, an unnatural amino acid derivative formed during processing of foods, may produce adverse effects on growth, protein digestibility, protein quality and mineral bioavailability and utilization. The antinutritional effects of LAL may be more pronounced in sole-source foods such as infant formulas and formulated liquid diets which have been reported to contain significant amounts (up to 2400 ppm of LAL in the protein) of LAL.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179581
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.953
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.887
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSarwar, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorL'abbé, MRen_US
dc.contributor.authorTrick, Ken_US
dc.contributor.authorBotting, HGen_US
dc.contributor.authorMa, CYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:59:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:59:59Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationAdvances In Experimental Medicine And Biology, 1999, v. 459, p. 161-177en_US
dc.identifier.issn0065-2598en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179581-
dc.description.abstractEffects of feeding alkaline (0.1 N NaOH) and heat treated (75°C for 3 h) proteins (lactalbumin and soybean protein isolate, SPI) on growth, and protein and mineral status of rats have been determined. The untreated and alkaline/heat treated lactalbumin contained 0.10 and 4.42 g lysinoalanine (LAL)/100 g protein, respectively. Similarly, the untreated and treated SPI contained 0.03 and 1.94 g LAL/100 g protein, respectively. The formation of LAL in the treated proteins was accompanied with a loss of cystine (73-77%), threonine (35-45%), serine (18-30%) and lysine (19-20%). The alkaline/heat treatments caused significant (P < 0.05) reductions in protein digestibility of lactalbumin (99 vs. 73%) and SPI (96 vs. 68%). The processing treatments also caused a drastic negative effect on protein quality, as measured by rat growth methods such as relative protein efficiency ratio (RPER) and relative net protein ratio (RNPR). The RPER and RNPR values of untreated lactalbumin and SPI were 89-91 and 56-64%, respectively. But the RPER and RNPR values of the treated lactalbumin and SPI were 0%. The mineral status of rats was also compromised by feeding alkaline/heat treated proteins. Liver iron levels in male rats (165-180 μg/g dry weight) and female rats (306-321 μg/g dry weight) fed the treated proteins were about half the levels in male rats (229-257 μg/g dry weight) and female rats (578-697 μg/g dry weight) fed the untreated proteins. The kidney iron contents of rats fed the treated proteins were also lower than that of rats fed the untreated proteins. Liver copper levels of male and female rats fed the treated proteins were up to three fold higher than those found in rats fed the untreated proteins. The data suggested that LAL, an unnatural amino acid derivative formed during processing of foods, may produce adverse effects on growth, protein digestibility, protein quality and mineral bioavailability and utilization. The antinutritional effects of LAL may be more pronounced in sole-source foods such as infant formulas and formulated liquid diets which have been reported to contain significant amounts (up to 2400 ppm of LAL in the protein) of LAL.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAmino Acids - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucose - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshBlood Urea Nitrogenen_US
dc.subject.meshCopper - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshDigestionen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshFood Handlingen_US
dc.subject.meshHemoglobins - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshHot Temperatureen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrogen-Ion Concentrationen_US
dc.subject.meshIron - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshKidney - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshLactalbumin - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshLiver - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshLysinoalanine - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshRatsen_US
dc.subject.meshRats, Sprague-Dawleyen_US
dc.subject.meshSoybean Proteins - Metabolismen_US
dc.titleInfluence of feeding alikaline/heat processed proteins on growth and protein and mineral status of ratsen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailMa, CY: macy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityMa, CY=rp00759en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.pmid10335375-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033281790en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033281790&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume459en_US
dc.identifier.spage161en_US
dc.identifier.epage177en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSarwar, G=7005985644en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridL'Abbé, MR=7004710112en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTrick, K=7003839259en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBotting, HG=6701333652en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMa, CY=7402924944en_US

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