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Article: Intrinsic resting-state activity predicts working memory brain activation and behavioral performance

TitleIntrinsic resting-state activity predicts working memory brain activation and behavioral performance
Authors
KeywordsAlff
Behavior
Load Dependency
N-Back Working Memory
Resting-State Fmri
Issue Date2013
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751
Citation
Human Brain Mapping, 2013, v. 34 n. 12, p. 3204-3215 How to Cite?
AbstractAlthough resting-state brain activity has been demonstrated to correspond with task-evoked brain activation, the relationship between intrinsic and evoked brain activity has not been fully characterized. For example, it is unclear whether intrinsic activity can also predict task-evoked deactivation and whether the rest-task relationship is dependent on task load. In this study, we addressed these issues on 40 healthy control subjects using resting-state and task-driven [N-back working memory (WM) task] functional magnetic resonance imaging data collected in the same session. Using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) as an index of intrinsic resting-state activity, we found that ALFF in the middle frontal gyrus and inferior/superior parietal lobules was positively correlated with WM task-evoked activation, while ALFF in the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, superior frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, and fusiform gyrus was negatively correlated with WM task-evoked deactivation. Further, the relationship between the intrinsic resting-state activity and task-evoked activation in lateral/superior frontal gyri, inferior/superior parietal lobules, superior temporal gyrus, and midline regions was stronger at higher WM task loads. In addition, both resting-state activity and the task-evoked activation in the superior parietal lobule/precuneus were significantly correlated with the WM task behavioral performance, explaining similar portions of intersubject performance variance. Together, these findings suggest that intrinsic resting-state activity facilitates or is permissive of specific brain circuit engagement to perform a cognitive task, and that resting activity can predict subsequent task-evoked brain responses and behavioral performance. Hum Brain Mapp, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179557
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.962
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.165
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZou, Qen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoss, TJen_US
dc.contributor.authorGu, Hen_US
dc.contributor.authorGeng, Xen_US
dc.contributor.authorZuo, XNen_US
dc.contributor.authorHong, LEen_US
dc.contributor.authorGao, JHen_US
dc.contributor.authorStein, EAen_US
dc.contributor.authorZang, YFen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, Yen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:58:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:58:20Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationHuman Brain Mapping, 2013, v. 34 n. 12, p. 3204-3215en_US
dc.identifier.issn1065-9471en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179557-
dc.description.abstractAlthough resting-state brain activity has been demonstrated to correspond with task-evoked brain activation, the relationship between intrinsic and evoked brain activity has not been fully characterized. For example, it is unclear whether intrinsic activity can also predict task-evoked deactivation and whether the rest-task relationship is dependent on task load. In this study, we addressed these issues on 40 healthy control subjects using resting-state and task-driven [N-back working memory (WM) task] functional magnetic resonance imaging data collected in the same session. Using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF) as an index of intrinsic resting-state activity, we found that ALFF in the middle frontal gyrus and inferior/superior parietal lobules was positively correlated with WM task-evoked activation, while ALFF in the medial prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, superior frontal gyrus, superior temporal gyrus, and fusiform gyrus was negatively correlated with WM task-evoked deactivation. Further, the relationship between the intrinsic resting-state activity and task-evoked activation in lateral/superior frontal gyri, inferior/superior parietal lobules, superior temporal gyrus, and midline regions was stronger at higher WM task loads. In addition, both resting-state activity and the task-evoked activation in the superior parietal lobule/precuneus were significantly correlated with the WM task behavioral performance, explaining similar portions of intersubject performance variance. Together, these findings suggest that intrinsic resting-state activity facilitates or is permissive of specific brain circuit engagement to perform a cognitive task, and that resting activity can predict subsequent task-evoked brain responses and behavioral performance. Hum Brain Mapp, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/jhome/38751en_US
dc.relation.ispartofHuman Brain Mappingen_US
dc.subjectAlffen_US
dc.subjectBehavioren_US
dc.subjectLoad Dependencyen_US
dc.subjectN-Back Working Memoryen_US
dc.subjectResting-State Fmrien_US
dc.titleIntrinsic resting-state activity predicts working memory brain activation and behavioral performanceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGeng, X: gengx@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGeng, X=rp01678en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/hbm.22136en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22711376-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84886300420en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000326068700008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZou, Q=14025198500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRoss, TJ=7203043487en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, H=35233258000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGeng, X=34771310000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZuo, XN=35091653400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHong, LE=8654915300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGao, JH=55252470600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStein, EA=7202194954en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZang, YF=7102641968en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, Y=7409387192en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike11038447-

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