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Article: Iconicity and indexicality: The body in Chinese art

TitleIconicity and indexicality: The body in Chinese art
Authors
Issue Date2005
PublisherMouton de Gruyter. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.degruyter.de/journals/semiotica
Citation
Semiotica, 2005, v. 155 n. 1-2, p. 229-248 How to Cite?
AbstractThis article examines the place of the body in Chinese art. It looks broadly at the case of literati painting and calligraphy and then offers a more historically focused examination of certain tendencies in modern Western-influenced Chinese painting, which was consciously antagonistic to literati values. Using Peirce's distinction between iconic and indexical modes of signification, it argues that while evocation of the body was important in literati visual culture, this was achieved primarily by indexical means, whereas in early twentieth century Chinese visual culture, iconic modes of representation were to become dominant. This modern contestation of the visual economy of literati painting is found particularly in paintings of the female nude. © Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG 2005.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179538
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.275
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:58:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:58:15Z-
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.identifier.citationSemiotica, 2005, v. 155 n. 1-2, p. 229-248en_US
dc.identifier.issn0037-1998en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179538-
dc.description.abstractThis article examines the place of the body in Chinese art. It looks broadly at the case of literati painting and calligraphy and then offers a more historically focused examination of certain tendencies in modern Western-influenced Chinese painting, which was consciously antagonistic to literati values. Using Peirce's distinction between iconic and indexical modes of signification, it argues that while evocation of the body was important in literati visual culture, this was achieved primarily by indexical means, whereas in early twentieth century Chinese visual culture, iconic modes of representation were to become dominant. This modern contestation of the visual economy of literati painting is found particularly in paintings of the female nude. © Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG 2005.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherMouton de Gruyter. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.degruyter.de/journals/semioticaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofSemioticaen_US
dc.titleIconicity and indexicality: The body in Chinese arten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailClarke, D: dclarke@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityClarke, D=rp01181en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1515/semi.2005.2005.155.1-4.229en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-61249132125en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-61249132125&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume155en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-2en_US
dc.identifier.spage229en_US
dc.identifier.epage248en_US
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridClarke, D=7403501488en_US

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