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Article: Phonology Matters: The Phonological Frequency Effect in Written Chinese

TitlePhonology Matters: The Phonological Frequency Effect in Written Chinese
Authors
Issue Date2000
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PSCI
Citation
Psychological Science, 2000, v. 11 n. 3, p. 234-238 How to Cite?
AbstractDoes phonology play a role in silent reading? This issue was addressed in Chinese. Phonology effects are less expected in Chinese than in alphabetical languages like English because the basic-units of written Chinese (the characters) map directly into units of meaning (morphemes). This linguistic property gave rise to the view that phonology could be bypassed altogether in Chinese. The present study, however, shows that this is not the case. We report two experiments that demonstrate pure phonological frequency effects in processing written Chinese. Characters with a high phonological frequency were processed faster than characters with a low phonological frequency, despite the fact that the characters were matched on orthographic (printed) frequency. The present research points to a universal phonological principle according to which phonological information is routinely activated as a part of word identification. The research further suggests that part of the classic word-frequency effect may be phonological.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179480
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.476
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.375
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZiegler, JCen_US
dc.contributor.authorTan, LHen_US
dc.contributor.authorPerry, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorMontant, Men_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:57:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:57:53Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Science, 2000, v. 11 n. 3, p. 234-238en_US
dc.identifier.issn0956-7976en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179480-
dc.description.abstractDoes phonology play a role in silent reading? This issue was addressed in Chinese. Phonology effects are less expected in Chinese than in alphabetical languages like English because the basic-units of written Chinese (the characters) map directly into units of meaning (morphemes). This linguistic property gave rise to the view that phonology could be bypassed altogether in Chinese. The present study, however, shows that this is not the case. We report two experiments that demonstrate pure phonological frequency effects in processing written Chinese. Characters with a high phonological frequency were processed faster than characters with a low phonological frequency, despite the fact that the characters were matched on orthographic (printed) frequency. The present research points to a universal phonological principle according to which phonological information is routinely activated as a part of word identification. The research further suggests that part of the classic word-frequency effect may be phonological.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PSCIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Scienceen_US
dc.titlePhonology Matters: The Phonological Frequency Effect in Written Chineseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailTan, LH: tanlh@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityTan, LH=rp01202en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0034188967en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0034188967&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage234en_US
dc.identifier.epage238en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZiegler, JC=7202576499en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTan, LH=7402233462en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPerry, C=7402124610en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMontant, M=6602326095en_US

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