File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Map mania: Nationalism and the politics of place in Greece, 1870-1922

TitleMap mania: Nationalism and the politics of place in Greece, 1870-1922
Authors
KeywordsBoundaries
Empire
Frontiers
Nationalism
Place
Issue Date2000
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/polgeo
Citation
Political Geography, 2000, v. 19 n. 1, p. 77-95 How to Cite?
AbstractThe rival claims over Macedonia by the Serbs, Greeks, Bulgarians, and Turks prompted the so-called 'map mania' in the 1870s as national antagonisms were played out in conflicting cartographic representations of the southern Balkans. With the establishment of Greece in the early 1830s the majority of the Greek population had been left in Ottoman lands beyond the sovereign state's frontiers. This gave rise to a militant irredentist ideology, known as the 'Great Idea', which pressed for the aggrandisement of the fledgling state to encompass all the Eastern lands inhabited by Greeks in a reconstituted Byzantine Empire. The present paper begins with a discussion of the meanings that accumulated around the concept of the 'frontier' in Greek nationalist thought and focuses on the debates in Greece about the imperative to redefine the Greek Kingdom's boundaries in the Balkans and Asia Minor. An analysis of these debates sheds light on a wider process: the naturalisation of boundaries in late 19th century Europe. In the course of the paper an examination is made of the ways in which geographical discourse served to legitimate claims to, and consolidate, territories. The emphasis on an imperialist geography co-existed with a celebration of local, regional geographies, and a key word of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century Greek nationalist discourse was 'place' (topos). The argument is put that the particularities of 'place' were construed both as underpinning a territorial expansion and as a resistance to the homogenising drive of a state sponsored nationalism.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179478
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.733
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.928
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPeckham, RSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:57:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:57:52Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationPolitical Geography, 2000, v. 19 n. 1, p. 77-95en_US
dc.identifier.issn0962-6298en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179478-
dc.description.abstractThe rival claims over Macedonia by the Serbs, Greeks, Bulgarians, and Turks prompted the so-called 'map mania' in the 1870s as national antagonisms were played out in conflicting cartographic representations of the southern Balkans. With the establishment of Greece in the early 1830s the majority of the Greek population had been left in Ottoman lands beyond the sovereign state's frontiers. This gave rise to a militant irredentist ideology, known as the 'Great Idea', which pressed for the aggrandisement of the fledgling state to encompass all the Eastern lands inhabited by Greeks in a reconstituted Byzantine Empire. The present paper begins with a discussion of the meanings that accumulated around the concept of the 'frontier' in Greek nationalist thought and focuses on the debates in Greece about the imperative to redefine the Greek Kingdom's boundaries in the Balkans and Asia Minor. An analysis of these debates sheds light on a wider process: the naturalisation of boundaries in late 19th century Europe. In the course of the paper an examination is made of the ways in which geographical discourse served to legitimate claims to, and consolidate, territories. The emphasis on an imperialist geography co-existed with a celebration of local, regional geographies, and a key word of late nineteenth and early twentieth-century Greek nationalist discourse was 'place' (topos). The argument is put that the particularities of 'place' were construed both as underpinning a territorial expansion and as a resistance to the homogenising drive of a state sponsored nationalism.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/polgeoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPolitical Geographyen_US
dc.subjectBoundariesen_US
dc.subjectEmpireen_US
dc.subjectFrontiersen_US
dc.subjectNationalismen_US
dc.subjectPlaceen_US
dc.titleMap mania: Nationalism and the politics of place in Greece, 1870-1922en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPeckham, RS: rpeckham@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPeckham, RS=rp01193en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0962-6298(99)00036-0en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033983682en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033983682&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage77en_US
dc.identifier.epage95en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000084646100008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeckham, RS=7004281688en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats