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Article: Innovative 'Artificial Mussels' technology for assessing spatial and temporal distribution of metals in Goulburn-Murray catchments waterways, Victoria, Australia: Effects of climate variability (dry vs. wet years)

TitleInnovative 'Artificial Mussels' technology for assessing spatial and temporal distribution of metals in Goulburn-Murray catchments waterways, Victoria, Australia: Effects of climate variability (dry vs. wet years)
Authors
KeywordsArtificial Mussel (Am)
Climate Variability
Hot Spots
Trace Metals
Issue Date2012
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envint
Citation
Environment International, 2012, v. 50, p. 38-46 How to Cite?
AbstractThe "Artificial mussel" (AM), a novel passive sampling technology, was used for the first time in Australia in freshwater to monitor and assess the risk of trace metals (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn). AMs were deployed at 10 sites within the Goulburn-Murray Water catchments, Victoria, Australia during a dry year (2009-2010) and a wet year (2010-2011). Our results showed that the AMs accumulated all the five metals. Cd, Pb, Hg were detected during the wet year but below detection limits during the dry year. At some sites close to orchards, vine yards and farming areas, elevated levels of Cu were clearly evident during the dry year, while elevated levels of Zn were found during the wet year; the Cu indicates localized inputs from the agricultural application of copper fungicide. The impacts from old mines were significantly less compared 'hot spots'. Our study demonstrated that climate variability (dry, wet years) can influence the metal inputs to waterways via different transport pathways. Using the AMs, we were able to identify various 'hot spots' of heavy metals, which may pose a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems (sub-lethal effects to fish) and public (via food chain metal bioaccumulation and biomagnification) in the Goulburn-Murray Water catchments. The State Protection Policy exempted artificial channels and drains from protection of beneficial use (including protection of aquatic ecosystems) and majority of sites ('hot spots') were located within artificial irrigation channels. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179320
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.929
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.684
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKibria, Gen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, TCen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, Ren_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:54:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:54:07Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironment International, 2012, v. 50, p. 38-46en_US
dc.identifier.issn0160-4120en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179320-
dc.description.abstractThe "Artificial mussel" (AM), a novel passive sampling technology, was used for the first time in Australia in freshwater to monitor and assess the risk of trace metals (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn). AMs were deployed at 10 sites within the Goulburn-Murray Water catchments, Victoria, Australia during a dry year (2009-2010) and a wet year (2010-2011). Our results showed that the AMs accumulated all the five metals. Cd, Pb, Hg were detected during the wet year but below detection limits during the dry year. At some sites close to orchards, vine yards and farming areas, elevated levels of Cu were clearly evident during the dry year, while elevated levels of Zn were found during the wet year; the Cu indicates localized inputs from the agricultural application of copper fungicide. The impacts from old mines were significantly less compared 'hot spots'. Our study demonstrated that climate variability (dry, wet years) can influence the metal inputs to waterways via different transport pathways. Using the AMs, we were able to identify various 'hot spots' of heavy metals, which may pose a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems (sub-lethal effects to fish) and public (via food chain metal bioaccumulation and biomagnification) in the Goulburn-Murray Water catchments. The State Protection Policy exempted artificial channels and drains from protection of beneficial use (including protection of aquatic ecosystems) and majority of sites ('hot spots') were located within artificial irrigation channels. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/envinten_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironment Internationalen_US
dc.subjectArtificial Mussel (Am)en_US
dc.subjectClimate Variabilityen_US
dc.subjectHot Spotsen_US
dc.subjectTrace Metalsen_US
dc.titleInnovative 'Artificial Mussels' technology for assessing spatial and temporal distribution of metals in Goulburn-Murray catchments waterways, Victoria, Australia: Effects of climate variability (dry vs. wet years)en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, R: rudolfwu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWu, R=rp01398en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envint.2012.09.006en_US
dc.identifier.pmid23070068-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84867302613en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84867302613&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume50en_US
dc.identifier.spage38en_US
dc.identifier.epage46en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000311924900006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKibria, G=55385563800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, TC=7102222310en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, R=7402945079en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike11785310-

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