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Article: Hypolithic microbial communities: Between a rock and a hard place

TitleHypolithic microbial communities: Between a rock and a hard place
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EMI
Citation
Environmental Microbiology, 2012, v. 14 n. 9, p. 2272-2282 How to Cite?
AbstractDrylands are the largest terrestrial biome on Earth and a ubiquitous feature is desert pavement terrain, comprising rocks embedded in the mineral soil surface. Quartz and other translucent rocks are common and microbial communities termed hypoliths develop as biofilms on their ventral surfaces. In extreme deserts these represent major concentrations of biomass, and are emerging as key to geobiological processes and soil stabilization. These highly specialized communities are dominated by cyanobacteria that support diverse heterotrophic assemblages. Here we identify global-scale trends in the ecology of hypoliths that are strongly related to climate, particularly with regard to shifts in cyanobacterial assemblages. A synthesis of available data revealed a linear trend for colonization with regard to climate, and we suggest potential application for hypoliths as 'biomarkers' of aridity on a landscape scale. The potential to exploit the soil-stabilizing properties of hypolithic colonization in environmental engineering on dryland soils is also discussed. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179304
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.932
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.002
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorLacap, DCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLau, MCYen_US
dc.contributor.authorHa, KYen_US
dc.contributor.authorWarrenRhodes, KAen_US
dc.contributor.authorCockell, CSen_US
dc.contributor.authorCowan, DAen_US
dc.contributor.authorMckay, CPen_US
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:53:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:53:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Microbiology, 2012, v. 14 n. 9, p. 2272-2282en_US
dc.identifier.issn1462-2912en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179304-
dc.description.abstractDrylands are the largest terrestrial biome on Earth and a ubiquitous feature is desert pavement terrain, comprising rocks embedded in the mineral soil surface. Quartz and other translucent rocks are common and microbial communities termed hypoliths develop as biofilms on their ventral surfaces. In extreme deserts these represent major concentrations of biomass, and are emerging as key to geobiological processes and soil stabilization. These highly specialized communities are dominated by cyanobacteria that support diverse heterotrophic assemblages. Here we identify global-scale trends in the ecology of hypoliths that are strongly related to climate, particularly with regard to shifts in cyanobacterial assemblages. A synthesis of available data revealed a linear trend for colonization with regard to climate, and we suggest potential application for hypoliths as 'biomarkers' of aridity on a landscape scale. The potential to exploit the soil-stabilizing properties of hypolithic colonization in environmental engineering on dryland soils is also discussed. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EMIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Microbiologyen_US
dc.titleHypolithic microbial communities: Between a rock and a hard placeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLau, MCY: maglau@princeton.eduen_US
dc.identifier.emailPointing, SB: pointing@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLau, MCY=rp00721en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPointing, SB=rp00771en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1462-2920.2012.02821.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid22779750-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865750443en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros218929-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84865750443&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume14en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage2272en_US
dc.identifier.epage2282en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000308300600003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, Y=35725244600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLacap, DC=9640383000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, MCY=35177794300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHa, KY=55303160200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWarrenRhodes, KA=6507272414en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCockell, CS=7004940683en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowan, DA=24425600900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMckay, CP=7101952183en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPointing, SB=6603986412en_US

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