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Article: Review of measured concentrations of triphenyltin compounds in marine ecosystems and meta-analysis of their risks to humans and the environment

TitleReview of measured concentrations of triphenyltin compounds in marine ecosystems and meta-analysis of their risks to humans and the environment
Authors
KeywordsAntifouling Agents
Bioaccumulation
Endocrine Disruption Chemicals
Marine Pollution
Organotin
Tpt
Issue Date2012
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphere
Citation
Chemosphere, 2012, v. 89 n. 9, p. 1015-1025 How to Cite?
AbstractThe state of scientific knowledge regarding analytical methods, environmental fate, ecotoxicity and ecological risk of triphenyltin (TPT) compounds in marine ecosystems as well as their exposure and health hazard to humans was reviewed. Since the 1960s, TPT compounds have been commonly applied as biocides for diverse industrial and agricultural purposes. For instance, they are used as active ingredients in antifouling systems on marine vessels and mariculture facilities, and as fungicides in agriculture. Due to their intensive use, contamination of coastal waters by TPT and its products of transformation has become a worldwide problem. The proportion of quantified TPT to total phenyltin compounds in the marine environment provides evidence that TPT is photodegradable in water and sediment but resistant to biotransformation. Concentrations of TPT in marine biota are consistently greater than concentrations in water and sediment, which implies potential of TPT to bioaccumulate. TPT is toxic to both marine plants and animals. The predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) for TPT, as determined by use of the species sensitivity distribution approach, is 0.64ngL -1. In some parts of the world, concentrations of TPT in seawater exceed the PNEC, indicating that TPT can pose risks to marine life. Although there is negligible risk of TPT to average human consumers, TPT has been detected in blood of Finnish people and the concentration was greater in fishermen who ate more seafood. It is, therefore, advocated to initiate regular monitoring of TPT in blood and breast milk of populations that consume greater amounts of seafood. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179302
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.698
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.536
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYi, AXen_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KMYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, MHWen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, JSen_US
dc.contributor.authorGiesy, JPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:53:58Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:53:58Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationChemosphere, 2012, v. 89 n. 9, p. 1015-1025en_US
dc.identifier.issn0045-6535en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179302-
dc.description.abstractThe state of scientific knowledge regarding analytical methods, environmental fate, ecotoxicity and ecological risk of triphenyltin (TPT) compounds in marine ecosystems as well as their exposure and health hazard to humans was reviewed. Since the 1960s, TPT compounds have been commonly applied as biocides for diverse industrial and agricultural purposes. For instance, they are used as active ingredients in antifouling systems on marine vessels and mariculture facilities, and as fungicides in agriculture. Due to their intensive use, contamination of coastal waters by TPT and its products of transformation has become a worldwide problem. The proportion of quantified TPT to total phenyltin compounds in the marine environment provides evidence that TPT is photodegradable in water and sediment but resistant to biotransformation. Concentrations of TPT in marine biota are consistently greater than concentrations in water and sediment, which implies potential of TPT to bioaccumulate. TPT is toxic to both marine plants and animals. The predicted no effect concentration (PNEC) for TPT, as determined by use of the species sensitivity distribution approach, is 0.64ngL -1. In some parts of the world, concentrations of TPT in seawater exceed the PNEC, indicating that TPT can pose risks to marine life. Although there is negligible risk of TPT to average human consumers, TPT has been detected in blood of Finnish people and the concentration was greater in fishermen who ate more seafood. It is, therefore, advocated to initiate regular monitoring of TPT in blood and breast milk of populations that consume greater amounts of seafood. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphereen_US
dc.relation.ispartofChemosphereen_US
dc.subjectAntifouling Agentsen_US
dc.subjectBioaccumulationen_US
dc.subjectEndocrine Disruption Chemicalsen_US
dc.subjectMarine Pollutionen_US
dc.subjectOrganotinen_US
dc.subjectTpten_US
dc.titleReview of measured concentrations of triphenyltin compounds in marine ecosystems and meta-analysis of their risks to humans and the environmenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLeung, KMY: kmyleung@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLeung, KMY=rp00733en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.chemosphere.2012.05.080en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22704212-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84865720429en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros224455-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84865720429&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume89en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage1015en_US
dc.identifier.epage1025en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000309331500001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYi, AX=55248271500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, KMY=7401860738en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, MHW=7202630175en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, JS=35465338700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGiesy, JP=35459135300en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike11580629-

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