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Article: Analyses of n-alkanes degrading community dynamics of a high-temperature methanogenic consortium enriched from production water of a petroleum reservoir by a combination of molecular techniques

TitleAnalyses of n-alkanes degrading community dynamics of a high-temperature methanogenic consortium enriched from production water of a petroleum reservoir by a combination of molecular techniques
Authors
KeywordsAlkylsuccinate Synthase
Anaerobic Biodegradation Of N-Alkanes
Methanogenic Enrichment
Microbial Community Dynamic
Production Water From Oil Reservoir
Issue Date2012
PublisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0963-9292
Citation
Ecotoxicology, 2012, v. 21 n. 6, p. 1680-1691 How to Cite?
AbstractDespite the knowledge on anaerobic degradation of hydrocarbons and signature metabolites in the oil reservoirs, little is known about the functioning microbes and the related biochemical pathways involved, especially about the methanogenic communities. In the present study, a methanogenic consortium enriched from high-temperature oil reservoir production water and incubated at 55 °C with a mixture of long chain n-alkanes (C 15-C 20) as the sole carbon and energy sources was characterized. Biodegradation of n-alkanes was observed as methane production in the alkanes-amended methanogenic enrichment reached 141.47 μmol above the controls after 749 days of incubation, corresponding to 17 % of the theoretical total. GC-MS analysis confirmed the presence of putative downstream metabolites probably from the anaerobic biodegradation of n-alkanes and indicating an incomplete conversion of the n-alkanes to methane. Enrichment cultures taken at different incubation times were subjected to microbial community analysis. Both 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and DGGE profiles showed that alkanes-degrading community was dynamic during incubation. The dominant bacterial species in the enrichment cultures were affiliated with Firmicutes members clustering with thermophilic syntrophic bacteria of the genera Moorella sp. and Gelria sp. Other represented within the bacterial community were members of the Leptospiraceae, Thermodesulfobiaceae, Thermotogaceae, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes and Candidate Division OP1. The archaeal community was predominantly represented by members of the phyla Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Corresponding sequences within the Euryarchaeota were associated with methanogens clustering with orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales and Methanobacteriales. On the other hand, PCR amplification for detection of functional genes encoding the alkylsuccinate synthase α-subunit (assA) was positive in the enrichment cultures. Moreover, the appearance of a new assA gene sequence identified in day 749 supported the establishment of a functioning microbial species in the enrichment. Our results indicate that n-alkanes are converted to methane slowly by a microbial community enriched from oilfield production water and fumarate addition is most likely the initial activation step of n-alkanes degradation under thermophilic methanogenic conditions. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179297
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.329
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.108
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, KPen_US
dc.contributor.authorMbadinga, SMen_US
dc.contributor.authorYang, SZen_US
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_US
dc.contributor.authorMu, BZen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:53:56Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:53:56Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationEcotoxicology, 2012, v. 21 n. 6, p. 1680-1691en_US
dc.identifier.issn0963-9292en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179297-
dc.description.abstractDespite the knowledge on anaerobic degradation of hydrocarbons and signature metabolites in the oil reservoirs, little is known about the functioning microbes and the related biochemical pathways involved, especially about the methanogenic communities. In the present study, a methanogenic consortium enriched from high-temperature oil reservoir production water and incubated at 55 °C with a mixture of long chain n-alkanes (C 15-C 20) as the sole carbon and energy sources was characterized. Biodegradation of n-alkanes was observed as methane production in the alkanes-amended methanogenic enrichment reached 141.47 μmol above the controls after 749 days of incubation, corresponding to 17 % of the theoretical total. GC-MS analysis confirmed the presence of putative downstream metabolites probably from the anaerobic biodegradation of n-alkanes and indicating an incomplete conversion of the n-alkanes to methane. Enrichment cultures taken at different incubation times were subjected to microbial community analysis. Both 16S rRNA gene clone libraries and DGGE profiles showed that alkanes-degrading community was dynamic during incubation. The dominant bacterial species in the enrichment cultures were affiliated with Firmicutes members clustering with thermophilic syntrophic bacteria of the genera Moorella sp. and Gelria sp. Other represented within the bacterial community were members of the Leptospiraceae, Thermodesulfobiaceae, Thermotogaceae, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes and Candidate Division OP1. The archaeal community was predominantly represented by members of the phyla Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota. Corresponding sequences within the Euryarchaeota were associated with methanogens clustering with orders Methanomicrobiales, Methanosarcinales and Methanobacteriales. On the other hand, PCR amplification for detection of functional genes encoding the alkylsuccinate synthase α-subunit (assA) was positive in the enrichment cultures. Moreover, the appearance of a new assA gene sequence identified in day 749 supported the establishment of a functioning microbial species in the enrichment. Our results indicate that n-alkanes are converted to methane slowly by a microbial community enriched from oilfield production water and fumarate addition is most likely the initial activation step of n-alkanes degradation under thermophilic methanogenic conditions. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer New York LLC. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0963-9292en_US
dc.relation.ispartofEcotoxicologyen_US
dc.rightsThe original publication is available at www.springerlink.com-
dc.subjectAlkylsuccinate Synthaseen_US
dc.subjectAnaerobic Biodegradation Of N-Alkanesen_US
dc.subjectMethanogenic Enrichmenten_US
dc.subjectMicrobial Community Dynamicen_US
dc.subjectProduction Water From Oil Reservoiren_US
dc.subject.meshAlkanes - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshBacteria, Anaerobic - classification - genetics - isolation and purification - metabolism-
dc.subject.meshMicrobial Consortia-
dc.subject.meshOil and Gas Fields - chemistry - microbiology-
dc.subject.meshWater Microbiology-
dc.titleAnalyses of n-alkanes degrading community dynamics of a high-temperature methanogenic consortium enriched from production water of a petroleum reservoir by a combination of molecular techniquesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10646-012-0949-5en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22688358-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84864879397en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros209715-
dc.identifier.hkuros224963-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84864879397&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage1680en_US
dc.identifier.epage1691en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000306592100013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, L=55243139100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, KP=54892913800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMbadinga, SM=36802004800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYang, SZ=49764409700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMu, BZ=7004585949en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10796962-

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