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Article: Overexpression of Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP2 enhances drought tolerance

TitleOverexpression of Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP2 enhances drought tolerance
Authors
KeywordsAbscisic Acid
Arabidopsis Thaliana
Guard Cells
Reactive Oxygen Species
Stomatal Closure
Issue Date2013
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PCE
Citation
Plant, Cell And Environment, 2013, v. 36 n. 2, p. 300-314 How to Cite?
AbstractArabidopsis thaliana acyl-CoA-binding protein 2 (ACBP2) is a stress-responsive protein that is also important in embryogenesis. Here, we assign a role for ACBP2 in abscisic acid (ABA) signalling during seed germination, seedling development and the drought response. ACBP2 was induced by ABA and drought, and transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing ACBP2 (ACBP2-OXs) showed increased sensitivity to ABA treatment during germination and seedling development. ACBP2-OXs also displayed improved drought tolerance and ABA-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in guard cells, thereby promoting stomatal closure, reducing water loss and enhancing drought tolerance. In contrast, acbp2 mutant plants showed decreased sensitivity to ABA in root development and were more sensitive to drought stress. RNA analyses revealed that ACBP2 overexpression up-regulated the expression of Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog D (AtrbohD) and AtrbohF, two NAD(P)H oxidases essential for ABA-mediated ROS production, whereas the expression of Hypersensitive to ABA1 (HAB1), an important negative regulator in ABA signalling, was down-regulated. In addition, transgenic plants expressing ACBP2pro:GUS showed beta-glucuronidase (GUS) staining in guard cells, confirming a role for ACBP2 at the stomata. These observations support a positive role for ACBP2 in promoting ABA signalling in germination, seedling development and the drought response. Arabidopsis thaliana acyl-CoA-binding protein 2 (ACBP2) is a stress-responsive protein that is also important in embryogenesis. ACBP2 was observed to be induced by ABA and drought treatment, and placed a positive role in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling during seed germination, seedling development and drought response. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179294
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.169
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.983
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDu, ZYen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, MXen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, QFen_US
dc.contributor.authorXiao, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorChye, MLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:53:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:53:55Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_US
dc.identifier.citationPlant, Cell And Environment, 2013, v. 36 n. 2, p. 300-314en_US
dc.identifier.issn0140-7791en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179294-
dc.description.abstractArabidopsis thaliana acyl-CoA-binding protein 2 (ACBP2) is a stress-responsive protein that is also important in embryogenesis. Here, we assign a role for ACBP2 in abscisic acid (ABA) signalling during seed germination, seedling development and the drought response. ACBP2 was induced by ABA and drought, and transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing ACBP2 (ACBP2-OXs) showed increased sensitivity to ABA treatment during germination and seedling development. ACBP2-OXs also displayed improved drought tolerance and ABA-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in guard cells, thereby promoting stomatal closure, reducing water loss and enhancing drought tolerance. In contrast, acbp2 mutant plants showed decreased sensitivity to ABA in root development and were more sensitive to drought stress. RNA analyses revealed that ACBP2 overexpression up-regulated the expression of Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog D (AtrbohD) and AtrbohF, two NAD(P)H oxidases essential for ABA-mediated ROS production, whereas the expression of Hypersensitive to ABA1 (HAB1), an important negative regulator in ABA signalling, was down-regulated. In addition, transgenic plants expressing ACBP2pro:GUS showed beta-glucuronidase (GUS) staining in guard cells, confirming a role for ACBP2 at the stomata. These observations support a positive role for ACBP2 in promoting ABA signalling in germination, seedling development and the drought response. Arabidopsis thaliana acyl-CoA-binding protein 2 (ACBP2) is a stress-responsive protein that is also important in embryogenesis. ACBP2 was observed to be induced by ABA and drought treatment, and placed a positive role in abscisic acid (ABA) signaling during seed germination, seedling development and drought response. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/PCEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPlant, Cell and Environmenten_US
dc.subjectAbscisic Aciden_US
dc.subjectArabidopsis Thalianaen_US
dc.subjectGuard Cellsen_US
dc.subjectReactive Oxygen Speciesen_US
dc.subjectStomatal Closureen_US
dc.titleOverexpression of Arabidopsis acyl-CoA-binding protein ACBP2 enhances drought toleranceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailXiao, S: xiaoshi@graduate.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChye, ML: mlchye@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityXiao, S=rp00817en_US
dc.identifier.authorityChye, ML=rp00687en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-3040.2012.02574.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid22788984-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84871918514en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros213968-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000312997700005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDu, ZY=36150734700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, MX=55327360000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, QF=7406335399en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridXiao, S=7402022635en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChye, ML=7003905460en_US

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