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Article: Microbial colonization and controls in dryland systems

TitleMicrobial colonization and controls in dryland systems
Authors
Issue Date2012
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nrmicro/
Citation
Nature Reviews Microbiology, 2012, v. 10 n. 8, p. 551-562 How to Cite?
AbstractDrylands constitute the most extensive terrestrial biome, covering more than one-third of the Earth's continental surface. In these environments, stress limits animal and plant life, so life forms that can survive desiccation and then resume growth following subsequent wetting assume the foremost role in ecosystem processes. In this Review, we describe how these organisms assemble in unique soil-and rock-surface communities to form a thin veneer of mostly microbial biomass across hot and cold deserts. These communities mediate inputs and outputs of gases, nutrients and water from desert surfaces, as well as regulating weathering, soil stability, and hydrological and nutrient cycles. The magnitude of regional and global desert-related environmental impacts is affected by these surface communities; here, we also discuss the challenges for incorporating the consideration of these communities and their effects into the management of dryland resources. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179292
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 24.727
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 16.373
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_US
dc.contributor.authorBelnap, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:53:53Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:53:53Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationNature Reviews Microbiology, 2012, v. 10 n. 8, p. 551-562en_US
dc.identifier.issn1740-1526en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179292-
dc.description.abstractDrylands constitute the most extensive terrestrial biome, covering more than one-third of the Earth's continental surface. In these environments, stress limits animal and plant life, so life forms that can survive desiccation and then resume growth following subsequent wetting assume the foremost role in ecosystem processes. In this Review, we describe how these organisms assemble in unique soil-and rock-surface communities to form a thin veneer of mostly microbial biomass across hot and cold deserts. These communities mediate inputs and outputs of gases, nutrients and water from desert surfaces, as well as regulating weathering, soil stability, and hydrological and nutrient cycles. The magnitude of regional and global desert-related environmental impacts is affected by these surface communities; here, we also discuss the challenges for incorporating the consideration of these communities and their effects into the management of dryland resources. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nrmicro/en_US
dc.relation.ispartofNature Reviews Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBiomassen_US
dc.subject.meshBiotaen_US
dc.subject.meshDesert Climateen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshMetabolismen_US
dc.titleMicrobial colonization and controls in dryland systemsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPointing, SB: pointing@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPointing, SB=rp00771en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/nrmicro2831en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22772903-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84863986135en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84863986135&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume10en_US
dc.identifier.issue8en_US
dc.identifier.spage551en_US
dc.identifier.epage562en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000306417400011-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPointing, SB=6603986412en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBelnap, J=7004034661en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike10881671-

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