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Article: Global patterns of stream detritivore distribution: Implications for biodiversity loss in changing climates

TitleGlobal patterns of stream detritivore distribution: Implications for biodiversity loss in changing climates
Authors
KeywordsDetritus
Diversity
Guild
Latitudinal Gradient
Leaf Litter
Shredders
Species Richness
Stream Ecosystems
Trophic Diversity
Issue Date2012
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/GEB
Citation
Global Ecology And Biogeography, 2012, v. 21 n. 2, p. 134-141 How to Cite?
AbstractAim We tested the hypothesis that shredder detritivores, a key trophic guild in stream ecosystems, are more diverse at higher latitudes, which has important ecological implications in the face of potential biodiversity losses that are expected as a result of climate change. We also explored the dependence of local shredder diversity on the regional species pool across latitudes, and examined the influence of environmental factors on shredder diversity. Location World-wide (156 sites from 17 regions located in all inhabited continents at latitudes ranging from 67°N to 41°S). Methods We used linear regression to examine the latitudinal variation in shredder diversity at different spatial scales: alpha (α), gamma (γ) and beta (β) diversity. We also explored the effect of γ-diversity on α-diversity across latitudes with regression analysis, and the possible influence of local environmental factors on shredder diversity with simple correlations. Results Alpha diversity increased with latitude, while γ- and β-diversity showed no clear latitudinal pattern. Temperate sites showed a linear relationship between γ- and α-diversity; in contrast, tropical sites showed evidence of local species saturation, which may explain why the latitudinal gradient in α-diversity is not accompanied by a gradient in γ-diversity. Alpha diversity was related to several local habitat characteristics, but γ- and β-diversity were not related to any of the environmental factors measured. Main conclusions Our results indicate that global patterns of shredder diversity are complex and depend on spatial scale. However, we can draw several conclusions that have important ecological implications. Alpha diversity is limited at tropical sites by local factors, implying a higher risk of loss of key species or the whole shredder guild (the latter implying the loss of trophic diversity). Even if regional species pools are not particularly species poor in the tropics, colonization from adjacent sites may be limited. Moreover, many shredder species belong to cool-adapted taxa that may be close to their thermal maxima in the tropics, which makes them more vulnerable to climate warming. Our results suggest that tropical streams require specific scientific attention and conservation efforts to prevent loss of shredder biodiversity and serious alteration of ecosystem processes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179266
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.84
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 4.650
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBoyero, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorPearson, RGen_US
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorFerreira, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorGraça, MASen_US
dc.contributor.authorGessner, MOen_US
dc.contributor.authorBoulton, AJen_US
dc.contributor.authorChauvet, Een_US
dc.contributor.authorYule, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorAlbariño, RJen_US
dc.contributor.authorRamírez, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorHelson, JEen_US
dc.contributor.authorCallisto, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorArunachalam, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorChará, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorFigueroa, Ren_US
dc.contributor.authorMathooko, JMen_US
dc.contributor.authorGonçalves Jr, JFen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoretti, MSen_US
dc.contributor.authorCharáSerna, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorDavies, JNen_US
dc.contributor.authorEncalada, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLamothe, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorBuria, LMen_US
dc.contributor.authorCastela, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorCornejo, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorLi, AOYen_US
dc.contributor.authorM'erimba, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorVillanueva, VDen_US
dc.contributor.authorDel Carmen Zúñiga, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorSwan, CMen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarmuta, LAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:53:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:53:31Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationGlobal Ecology And Biogeography, 2012, v. 21 n. 2, p. 134-141en_US
dc.identifier.issn1466-822Xen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179266-
dc.description.abstractAim We tested the hypothesis that shredder detritivores, a key trophic guild in stream ecosystems, are more diverse at higher latitudes, which has important ecological implications in the face of potential biodiversity losses that are expected as a result of climate change. We also explored the dependence of local shredder diversity on the regional species pool across latitudes, and examined the influence of environmental factors on shredder diversity. Location World-wide (156 sites from 17 regions located in all inhabited continents at latitudes ranging from 67°N to 41°S). Methods We used linear regression to examine the latitudinal variation in shredder diversity at different spatial scales: alpha (α), gamma (γ) and beta (β) diversity. We also explored the effect of γ-diversity on α-diversity across latitudes with regression analysis, and the possible influence of local environmental factors on shredder diversity with simple correlations. Results Alpha diversity increased with latitude, while γ- and β-diversity showed no clear latitudinal pattern. Temperate sites showed a linear relationship between γ- and α-diversity; in contrast, tropical sites showed evidence of local species saturation, which may explain why the latitudinal gradient in α-diversity is not accompanied by a gradient in γ-diversity. Alpha diversity was related to several local habitat characteristics, but γ- and β-diversity were not related to any of the environmental factors measured. Main conclusions Our results indicate that global patterns of shredder diversity are complex and depend on spatial scale. However, we can draw several conclusions that have important ecological implications. Alpha diversity is limited at tropical sites by local factors, implying a higher risk of loss of key species or the whole shredder guild (the latter implying the loss of trophic diversity). Even if regional species pools are not particularly species poor in the tropics, colonization from adjacent sites may be limited. Moreover, many shredder species belong to cool-adapted taxa that may be close to their thermal maxima in the tropics, which makes them more vulnerable to climate warming. Our results suggest that tropical streams require specific scientific attention and conservation efforts to prevent loss of shredder biodiversity and serious alteration of ecosystem processes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/GEBen_US
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Ecology and Biogeographyen_US
dc.rightsThe definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com-
dc.subjectDetritusen_US
dc.subjectDiversityen_US
dc.subjectGuilden_US
dc.subjectLatitudinal Gradienten_US
dc.subjectLeaf Litteren_US
dc.subjectShreddersen_US
dc.subjectSpecies Richnessen_US
dc.subjectStream Ecosystemsen_US
dc.subjectTrophic Diversityen_US
dc.titleGlobal patterns of stream detritivore distribution: Implications for biodiversity loss in changing climatesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1466-8238.2011.00673.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84855530321en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros199553-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84855530321&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume21en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage134en_US
dc.identifier.epage141en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1466-8238-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000298912900004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBoyero, L=6602083170en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPearson, RG=7401904911en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFerreira, V=8564663900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGraça, MAS=7005609094en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGessner, MO=26534107100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBoulton, AJ=35267971600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChauvet, E=7004042542en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYule, CM=6603049087en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridAlbariño, RJ=6602175928en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRamírez, A=7401735232en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHelson, JE=12239552200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCallisto, M=6602888024en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridArunachalam, M=8851791400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChará, J=6506295303en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFigueroa, R=7005961064en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMathooko, JM=7003378713en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGonçalves Jr, JF=13806594800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMoretti, MS=16643472000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCharáSerna, AM=36439163200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDavies, JN=28067773400en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridEncalada, A=6507051570en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLamothe, S=37014629200en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBuria, LM=22133355500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCastela, J=24066481900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCornejo, A=35104671800en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLi, AOY=24773824300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridM'Erimba, C=6508194130en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVillanueva, VD=7004695653en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDel Carmen Zúñiga, M=14035090600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSwan, CM=7006888369en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarmuta, LA=6602541085en_US

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