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Article: Hypolithic microbial communities of quartz rocks from Miers Valley, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica

TitleHypolithic microbial communities of quartz rocks from Miers Valley, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica
Authors
KeywordsAntarctic Dry Valleys
Dgge
Hypolith
Microbial Colonisation
Phylogenetics
Issue Date2011
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00300/index.htm
Citation
Polar Biology, 2011, v. 34 n. 11, p. 1657-1668 How to Cite?
AbstractThe McMurdo Dry Valleys region of eastern Antarctica is a cold desert that presents extreme challenges to life. Hypolithic microbial colonisation of the subsoil surfaces of translucent quartz rocks represent a significant source of terrestrial biomass and productivity in this region. Previous studies have described hypoliths as dominated by cyanobacteria. However, hypoliths that occur in the lower Dry Valleys such as the Miers, Garwood and Marshall Valleys are unusual as they are not necessarily cyanobacteria-dominated. These hypoliths support significant eukaryal colonisation by fungi and mosses in addition to cyanobacteria-dominated bacterial assemblages and so have considerable ecological value in this barren landscape. Here, we characterise these novel hypoliths by analysis of environmental rRNA gene sequences. The hypolithic community was demonstrated to be distinct from the surrounding soil and non-translucent rocks. Hypoliths supported cyanobacterial signatures from the Oscillatoriales and Nostocales. Other heterotrophic bacterial signatures were also recovered, and these were phylogenetically diverse and spanned 8 other bacterial phyla. Archaeal phylotypes recovered were phylogenetically affiliated with the large group of unclassified, uncultured Crenarcheota. Eukaryal phylotypes indicated that free-living ascomycetous fungi, chlorophytes and mosses (Bryum sp.) were all supported by these hypoliths, and these are thought to be responsible for the extensive eukaryotic biomass that develops around quartz rocks. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179257
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.711
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.983
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorTuffin, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorStafford, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorCary, Cen_US
dc.contributor.authorLacap, DCen_US
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_US
dc.contributor.authorCowan, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:53:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:53:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationPolar Biology, 2011, v. 34 n. 11, p. 1657-1668en_US
dc.identifier.issn0722-4060en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179257-
dc.description.abstractThe McMurdo Dry Valleys region of eastern Antarctica is a cold desert that presents extreme challenges to life. Hypolithic microbial colonisation of the subsoil surfaces of translucent quartz rocks represent a significant source of terrestrial biomass and productivity in this region. Previous studies have described hypoliths as dominated by cyanobacteria. However, hypoliths that occur in the lower Dry Valleys such as the Miers, Garwood and Marshall Valleys are unusual as they are not necessarily cyanobacteria-dominated. These hypoliths support significant eukaryal colonisation by fungi and mosses in addition to cyanobacteria-dominated bacterial assemblages and so have considerable ecological value in this barren landscape. Here, we characterise these novel hypoliths by analysis of environmental rRNA gene sequences. The hypolithic community was demonstrated to be distinct from the surrounding soil and non-translucent rocks. Hypoliths supported cyanobacterial signatures from the Oscillatoriales and Nostocales. Other heterotrophic bacterial signatures were also recovered, and these were phylogenetically diverse and spanned 8 other bacterial phyla. Archaeal phylotypes recovered were phylogenetically affiliated with the large group of unclassified, uncultured Crenarcheota. Eukaryal phylotypes indicated that free-living ascomycetous fungi, chlorophytes and mosses (Bryum sp.) were all supported by these hypoliths, and these are thought to be responsible for the extensive eukaryotic biomass that develops around quartz rocks. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00300/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofPolar Biologyen_US
dc.subjectAntarctic Dry Valleysen_US
dc.subjectDggeen_US
dc.subjectHypolithen_US
dc.subjectMicrobial Colonisationen_US
dc.subjectPhylogeneticsen_US
dc.titleHypolithic microbial communities of quartz rocks from Miers Valley, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarcticaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPointing, SB: pointing@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPointing, SB=rp00771en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00300-011-1061-7en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80053991326en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros218936-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80053991326&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue11en_US
dc.identifier.spage1657en_US
dc.identifier.epage1668en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000297202900004-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKhan, N=39861594900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTuffin, M=26326600100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridStafford, W=36856136300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCary, C=6603172366en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLacap, DC=9640383000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPointing, SB=6603986412en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCowan, D=24425600900en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike9655371-

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