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Article: DNA technologies for monitoring waterborne pathogens: A revolution in water pollution monitoring

TitleDNA technologies for monitoring waterborne pathogens: A revolution in water pollution monitoring
Authors
Issue Date2009
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ocecoaman
Citation
Ocean And Coastal Management, 2009, v. 52 n. 7, p. 355-358 How to Cite?
AbstractDue to increasing population growth and anthropogenic pollution in the coastal zone, contamination of water and seafood with pathogens is probably responsible for the greatest number of human morbidities and mortalities worldwide. Hence, regular monitoring of waterborne pathogens is required to safeguard public health. Current techniques rely on the culturing of nonpathogenic indicator organisms (e.g. Escherichia coli or coliforms) for detection by inference. However, recent epidemiological evidence shows poor correlation between concentrations of E. coli/coliform and waterborne pathogens. Moreover, traditional methods are slow, not cost-effective, unable to distinguish harmful from benign strains, and fail to detect viable but nonculturable pathogens. The use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has provided rapid and highly sensitive methods for the specific detection of pathogenic microorganisms. This paper briefly reviews some DNA-based technologies for waterborne pathogen detection, and describes our recent development of two new DNA-based technologies-quantitative multiplex PCR (Q-mPCR) and DNA microarray-that allow simultaneous and cost-effective detection and quantification of numerous pathogens in a single sample, which is superior to the culture methods currently in use. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179143
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.696
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.784
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKong, RYCen_US
dc.contributor.authorMak, MMHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWu, RSSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:52:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:52:19Z-
dc.date.issued2009en_US
dc.identifier.citationOcean And Coastal Management, 2009, v. 52 n. 7, p. 355-358en_US
dc.identifier.issn0964-5691en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179143-
dc.description.abstractDue to increasing population growth and anthropogenic pollution in the coastal zone, contamination of water and seafood with pathogens is probably responsible for the greatest number of human morbidities and mortalities worldwide. Hence, regular monitoring of waterborne pathogens is required to safeguard public health. Current techniques rely on the culturing of nonpathogenic indicator organisms (e.g. Escherichia coli or coliforms) for detection by inference. However, recent epidemiological evidence shows poor correlation between concentrations of E. coli/coliform and waterborne pathogens. Moreover, traditional methods are slow, not cost-effective, unable to distinguish harmful from benign strains, and fail to detect viable but nonculturable pathogens. The use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has provided rapid and highly sensitive methods for the specific detection of pathogenic microorganisms. This paper briefly reviews some DNA-based technologies for waterborne pathogen detection, and describes our recent development of two new DNA-based technologies-quantitative multiplex PCR (Q-mPCR) and DNA microarray-that allow simultaneous and cost-effective detection and quantification of numerous pathogens in a single sample, which is superior to the culture methods currently in use. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ocecoamanen_US
dc.relation.ispartofOcean and Coastal Managementen_US
dc.titleDNA technologies for monitoring waterborne pathogens: A revolution in water pollution monitoringen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWu, RSS: rudolfwu@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWu, RSS=rp01398en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2009.04.011en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-67650545139en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-67650545139&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume52en_US
dc.identifier.issue7en_US
dc.identifier.spage355en_US
dc.identifier.epage358en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000269073600006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKong, RYC=7005290687en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMak, MMH=14016370300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWu, RSS=7402945079en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike5318042-

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