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Article: Profile of a fishery collapse: Why mariculture failed to save the large yellow croaker

TitleProfile of a fishery collapse: Why mariculture failed to save the large yellow croaker
Authors
KeywordsBiodiversity
Fishery
Management
Mariculture
Restocking
Threatened Species
Issue Date2008
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FAF
Citation
Fish And Fisheries, 2008, v. 9 n. 3, p. 219-242 How to Cite?
AbstractThe large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea), endemic to East Asia was once one of the three top commercial marine fishes of China PR. Heavily exploited since the 1950s, wild stocks were so severely depleted by the 1980s that most individuals subsequently sold originated from hatcheries. After peaking at about 200 000 tonnes in the mid-1970s, catches of the croaker in China PR declined by over 90% within just 2 decades; according to most decline criteria this would categorize the croaker as "threatened" and management measures, including restocking, were developed. The extensive government-sponsored mariculture program introduced to address food supply and overfishing in the 1980s, particularly of the croaker, was one of the earliest for marine finfish, not only in China PR, a nation with a rich and highly successful history in aquaculture, but globally. In this first, in-depth, profile of a key fishery and early mariculture development, we integrate ecological and biological information with the fishing, management, mariculture and economic history to trace the collapse of wild stocks and assess why management and mariculture did not result in wild stock recovery. Evidence strongly suggests that a combination of heavy exploitation of spawning and over-wintering aggregations, poor management and overfishing pressure were major factors in stock declines, with contributions from pollution, habitat degradation and marine ecosystem shift. Although the croaker proved a highly successful mariculture candidate, with approximately 70 000 tonnes produced in 2005, the highest of any marine fish cultured in China PR, mariculture and restocking have failed to restore croaker stocks and may have, inadvertently, led to biodiversity losses. The detailed history of the croaker is a sobering reminder that successful mariculture, albeit important for food production and livelihoods, is not necessarily a solution to overfishing, and moreover, may have compromised fishery recovery by competing for funds, attention, space, and maybe genetic resources. © 2008 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179069
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 8.521
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.751
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorDe Mitcheson, YSen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:51:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:51:45Z-
dc.date.issued2008en_US
dc.identifier.citationFish And Fisheries, 2008, v. 9 n. 3, p. 219-242en_US
dc.identifier.issn1467-2960en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179069-
dc.description.abstractThe large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea), endemic to East Asia was once one of the three top commercial marine fishes of China PR. Heavily exploited since the 1950s, wild stocks were so severely depleted by the 1980s that most individuals subsequently sold originated from hatcheries. After peaking at about 200 000 tonnes in the mid-1970s, catches of the croaker in China PR declined by over 90% within just 2 decades; according to most decline criteria this would categorize the croaker as "threatened" and management measures, including restocking, were developed. The extensive government-sponsored mariculture program introduced to address food supply and overfishing in the 1980s, particularly of the croaker, was one of the earliest for marine finfish, not only in China PR, a nation with a rich and highly successful history in aquaculture, but globally. In this first, in-depth, profile of a key fishery and early mariculture development, we integrate ecological and biological information with the fishing, management, mariculture and economic history to trace the collapse of wild stocks and assess why management and mariculture did not result in wild stock recovery. Evidence strongly suggests that a combination of heavy exploitation of spawning and over-wintering aggregations, poor management and overfishing pressure were major factors in stock declines, with contributions from pollution, habitat degradation and marine ecosystem shift. Although the croaker proved a highly successful mariculture candidate, with approximately 70 000 tonnes produced in 2005, the highest of any marine fish cultured in China PR, mariculture and restocking have failed to restore croaker stocks and may have, inadvertently, led to biodiversity losses. The detailed history of the croaker is a sobering reminder that successful mariculture, albeit important for food production and livelihoods, is not necessarily a solution to overfishing, and moreover, may have compromised fishery recovery by competing for funds, attention, space, and maybe genetic resources. © 2008 The Authors.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/FAFen_US
dc.relation.ispartofFish and Fisheriesen_US
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_US
dc.subjectFisheryen_US
dc.subjectManagementen_US
dc.subjectMaricultureen_US
dc.subjectRestockingen_US
dc.subjectThreatened Speciesen_US
dc.titleProfile of a fishery collapse: Why mariculture failed to save the large yellow croakeren_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDe Mitcheson, YS: yjsadovy@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDe Mitcheson, YS=rp00773en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-2979.2008.00278.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-49249132792en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros164848-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-49249132792&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage219en_US
dc.identifier.epage242en_US
dc.identifier.eissn1467-2979-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000258291800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, M=55458136600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDe Mitcheson, YS=6603830002en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike3111965-

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