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Article: Thermophilic microbial mats in a tropical geothermal location display pronounced seasonal changes but appear resilient to stochastic disturbance

TitleThermophilic microbial mats in a tropical geothermal location display pronounced seasonal changes but appear resilient to stochastic disturbance
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EMI
Citation
Environmental Microbiology, 2007, v. 9 n. 12, p. 3065-3076 How to Cite?
AbstractWe demonstrate for the first time a dynamic seasonality within thermophilic mat communities in a tropical geothermal spring. Biomass fluctuated such that it is greatest in the dry season, before falling drastically as the summer rains arrive, and then re-colonization culminates in a new climax in the following dry season. Species richness estimates based upon 16S rRNA gene environmental phylotypes mirrored this pattern, where those unique to the dry season disappear during the wet season only to reappear the following year, and vice versa. Relative abundance of some phototrophic phylotypes was also shown to vary seasonally. Environmental variables within the thermal environment that were most closely correlated to these variations were temperature and phosphate, with the latter a covariable to heavy seasonal tropical monsoon rainfall. Stochastic disturbance caused by a strong typhoon caused significant although temporary effects and both diversity and standing biomass recovered within a few months. Tropical hot spring communities clearly function under a fundamentally different set of abiotic variables from those in temperate locations which do not display seasonality. This is of particular relevance to bioprospecting efforts where targeting the most biodiverse niche is desired, because future sampling strategies for tropical thermal environments should consider diversity on temporal as well as spatial scales. © 2007 The Authors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179020
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 5.932
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.002
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLacap, DCen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarraquio, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:51:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:51:28Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Microbiology, 2007, v. 9 n. 12, p. 3065-3076en_US
dc.identifier.issn1462-2912en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/179020-
dc.description.abstractWe demonstrate for the first time a dynamic seasonality within thermophilic mat communities in a tropical geothermal spring. Biomass fluctuated such that it is greatest in the dry season, before falling drastically as the summer rains arrive, and then re-colonization culminates in a new climax in the following dry season. Species richness estimates based upon 16S rRNA gene environmental phylotypes mirrored this pattern, where those unique to the dry season disappear during the wet season only to reappear the following year, and vice versa. Relative abundance of some phototrophic phylotypes was also shown to vary seasonally. Environmental variables within the thermal environment that were most closely correlated to these variations were temperature and phosphate, with the latter a covariable to heavy seasonal tropical monsoon rainfall. Stochastic disturbance caused by a strong typhoon caused significant although temporary effects and both diversity and standing biomass recovered within a few months. Tropical hot spring communities clearly function under a fundamentally different set of abiotic variables from those in temperate locations which do not display seasonality. This is of particular relevance to bioprospecting efforts where targeting the most biodiverse niche is desired, because future sampling strategies for tropical thermal environments should consider diversity on temporal as well as spatial scales. © 2007 The Authors.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/EMIen_US
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshBacteria - Classification - Genetics - Growth & Development - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshCyanobacteria - Classification - Genetics - Growth & Development - Isolation & Purificationen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Bacterial - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshEcosystemen_US
dc.subject.meshHot Springs - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHot Temperatureen_US
dc.subject.meshMolecular Sequence Dataen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Ribosomal, 16S - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen_US
dc.subject.meshSequence Analysis, Dnaen_US
dc.subject.meshStochastic Processesen_US
dc.subject.meshTropical Climateen_US
dc.titleThermophilic microbial mats in a tropical geothermal location display pronounced seasonal changes but appear resilient to stochastic disturbanceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailPointing, SB: pointing@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityPointing, SB=rp00771en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1462-2920.2007.01417.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid17991034-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-35948948699en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-35948948699&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume9en_US
dc.identifier.issue12en_US
dc.identifier.spage3065en_US
dc.identifier.epage3076en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000250761300014-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLacap, DC=9640383000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarraquio, W=6602174464en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPointing, SB=6603986412en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike1894960-

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