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Article: Environmental fate of endocrine-disrupting dimethyl phthalate esters (DMPE) under sulfate-reducing condition

TitleEnvironmental fate of endocrine-disrupting dimethyl phthalate esters (DMPE) under sulfate-reducing condition
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenv
Citation
Science Of The Total Environment, 2007, v. 381 n. 1-3, p. 126-133 How to Cite?
AbstractDimethyl phthalate esters (DMPE) can easily be released into the environment from plastic products. As endocrine disruptors, DMPE mimic estrogenic activities in animals and humans. The metabolites of DMPE are suspected to cause even more serious health problems. Among the common sterilization techniques adopted in the study of DMPE degradation, the average loss of the parent DMPE compounds after autoclaving was as high as 21.26%. In contrast, the loss after 0.2 μm filtration was significantly lower at 2.28%. It is suggested that filtration should be used over autoclaving for sterilizing DMPE. The environmental fate of DMPE under sulfate-reducing condition was simulated and studied in microcosm system. It was observed that dimethyl phthalate (DMP), dimethyl isophthalate (DMI) and dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) could not be mineralized over an extended period of 6 months, but with the transformation to the respective monomethyl phthalate and/or phthalic acid. The dominant species of microorganisms utilizing individual DMPE isomer as the sole carbon source were isolated and identified as facultative anaerobe Thauera sp., Xanthobacter sp. and Agrobacterium sp. for DMP, DMI and DMT, respectively. This study illustrates that the detrimental DMPE and their natural metabolites may accumulate in the sulfate-reducing environment. Accordingly, proper surveillance program should be devised to monitor both the parent compounds and degradation intermediates of DMPE in order to protect the aquatic ecosystem and human health. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178999
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.976
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.702
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, JKHen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, RKWen_US
dc.contributor.authorShi, MYen_US
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:51:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:51:20Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationScience Of The Total Environment, 2007, v. 381 n. 1-3, p. 126-133en_US
dc.identifier.issn0048-9697en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178999-
dc.description.abstractDimethyl phthalate esters (DMPE) can easily be released into the environment from plastic products. As endocrine disruptors, DMPE mimic estrogenic activities in animals and humans. The metabolites of DMPE are suspected to cause even more serious health problems. Among the common sterilization techniques adopted in the study of DMPE degradation, the average loss of the parent DMPE compounds after autoclaving was as high as 21.26%. In contrast, the loss after 0.2 μm filtration was significantly lower at 2.28%. It is suggested that filtration should be used over autoclaving for sterilizing DMPE. The environmental fate of DMPE under sulfate-reducing condition was simulated and studied in microcosm system. It was observed that dimethyl phthalate (DMP), dimethyl isophthalate (DMI) and dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) could not be mineralized over an extended period of 6 months, but with the transformation to the respective monomethyl phthalate and/or phthalic acid. The dominant species of microorganisms utilizing individual DMPE isomer as the sole carbon source were isolated and identified as facultative anaerobe Thauera sp., Xanthobacter sp. and Agrobacterium sp. for DMP, DMI and DMT, respectively. This study illustrates that the detrimental DMPE and their natural metabolites may accumulate in the sulfate-reducing environment. Accordingly, proper surveillance program should be devised to monitor both the parent compounds and degradation intermediates of DMPE in order to protect the aquatic ecosystem and human health. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/scitotenven_US
dc.relation.ispartofScience of the Total Environmenten_US
dc.rightsScience of the Total Environment. Copyright © Elsevier BV.-
dc.subject.meshBiodegradation, Environmentalen_US
dc.subject.meshEndocrine Disruptors - Analysis - Chemistry - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Monitoringen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Pollutants - Analysis - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshEsters - Analysis - Chemistry - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshPhthalic Acids - Analysis - Chemistry - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshRhizobium - Classification - Isolation & Purification - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshSulfates - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshThauera - Classification - Isolation & Purification - Metabolismen_US
dc.titleEnvironmental fate of endocrine-disrupting dimethyl phthalate esters (DMPE) under sulfate-reducing conditionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2007.03.030en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17462710-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34249722651en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros134298-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34249722651&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume381en_US
dc.identifier.issue1-3en_US
dc.identifier.spage126en_US
dc.identifier.epage133en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247831700012-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, JKH=16400912500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, RKW=35080690100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShi, MY=35081157100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_US

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