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Article: The effects of temperature, pH and sulphide on the community structure of hyperthermophilic streamers in hot springs of northern Thailand

TitleThe effects of temperature, pH and sulphide on the community structure of hyperthermophilic streamers in hot springs of northern Thailand
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0168-6496
Citation
Fems Microbiology Ecology, 2007, v. 60 n. 3, p. 456-466 How to Cite?
AbstractHyperthermophilic community diversity was assessed in hot-spring streamers along gradients of temperature, pH and sulphide in northern Thailand. A hierarchical sampling design was employed to obtain biomass for culture-independent estimates of 16S rRNA gene-defined prokaryotic diversity. All springs supported several archaeal and bacterial phylotypes, including novel phylotypes that expand the known phylogenetic diversity of terrestrial hyperthermophiles. Diversity appeared significantly greater than that observed for several other geographic locations. Phylotypes belonging to the Aquificales were ubiquitous, further supporting the hypothesis that these chemolithoautotrophs are key members of all hyperthermophilic communities. The chemoorganotrophic genus Thermus was also represented by phylotypes in all springs. Other bacterial taxa represented by environmental sequences included Bacillus, Thermotoga and various unidentified Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. Archaeal phylotypes included the Crenarchaea Desulfurococcus, Pyrobaculum, plus several unidentified hyperthermophilic lineages. A Methanothermococcus-like Euryarchaeon was also identified, with this genus not previously known from streamer communities. A multivariate approach to the analysis of biotic and abiotic data revealed that diversity patterns were best explained by a combination of temperature and sulphide rather than by any other abiotic variable either individually or in combination. © 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178998
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.53
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.687
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorPurcell, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorSompong, Uen_US
dc.contributor.authorYim, LCen_US
dc.contributor.authorBarraclough, TGen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeerapornpisal, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorPointing, SBen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:51:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:51:20Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationFems Microbiology Ecology, 2007, v. 60 n. 3, p. 456-466en_US
dc.identifier.issn0168-6496en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178998-
dc.description.abstractHyperthermophilic community diversity was assessed in hot-spring streamers along gradients of temperature, pH and sulphide in northern Thailand. A hierarchical sampling design was employed to obtain biomass for culture-independent estimates of 16S rRNA gene-defined prokaryotic diversity. All springs supported several archaeal and bacterial phylotypes, including novel phylotypes that expand the known phylogenetic diversity of terrestrial hyperthermophiles. Diversity appeared significantly greater than that observed for several other geographic locations. Phylotypes belonging to the Aquificales were ubiquitous, further supporting the hypothesis that these chemolithoautotrophs are key members of all hyperthermophilic communities. The chemoorganotrophic genus Thermus was also represented by phylotypes in all springs. Other bacterial taxa represented by environmental sequences included Bacillus, Thermotoga and various unidentified Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. Archaeal phylotypes included the Crenarchaea Desulfurococcus, Pyrobaculum, plus several unidentified hyperthermophilic lineages. A Methanothermococcus-like Euryarchaeon was also identified, with this genus not previously known from streamer communities. A multivariate approach to the analysis of biotic and abiotic data revealed that diversity patterns were best explained by a combination of temperature and sulphide rather than by any other abiotic variable either individually or in combination. © 2007 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd.. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.wiley.com/bw/journal.asp?ref=0168-6496en_US
dc.relation.ispartofFEMS Microbiology Ecologyen_US
dc.rightsF E M S Microbiology Ecology. Copyright © Blackwell Publishing Ltd.-
dc.subject.meshBacteria - Classification - Genetics - Isolation & Purification - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshBiodiversityen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Bacterial - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshDna, Ribosomal - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshHot Springs - Microbiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshHydrogen-Ion Concentrationen_US
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshPhylogenyen_US
dc.subject.meshRna, Ribosomal, 16S - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshSulfides - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshTemperatureen_US
dc.subject.meshThailanden_US
dc.titleThe effects of temperature, pH and sulphide on the community structure of hyperthermophilic streamers in hot springs of northern Thailanden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailYim, LC: maglau@princeton.eduen_US
dc.identifier.emailPointing, SB: pointing@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityYim, LC=rp00721en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPointing, SB=rp00771en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1574-6941.2007.00302.xen_US
dc.identifier.pmid17386034-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34249095755en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros130335-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34249095755&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume60en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage456en_US
dc.identifier.epage466en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000246708800012-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPurcell, D=16317417500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSompong, U=8661391100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYim, LC=35177794300en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBarraclough, TG=6603795033en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeerapornpisal, Y=6506468433en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPointing, SB=6603986412en_US

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