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Article: Differences in Michaelis-Menten kinetics for different cultivars of maize during cyanide removal

TitleDifferences in Michaelis-Menten kinetics for different cultivars of maize during cyanide removal
Authors
Issue Date2007
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecoenv
Citation
Ecotoxicology And Environmental Safety, 2007, v. 67 n. 2, p. 254-259 How to Cite?
AbstractKnowledge of the kinetic parameters, the half-saturation constant (Km) and the maximum metabolic capacity (vmax), is very useful for the characterization of enzymes and biochemical processes. Little is known about rates of which vegetation metabolizes environmental chemicals. It is known, however, that vascular plants possess an enzyme system that detoxifies cyanide by converting it into the amino acid asparagine. This study investigated the differences in Michaelis-Menten kinetics of cyanide removal by different cultivars of maize. Detached leaves (1.0 g fresh weight) of seven different cultivars of maize (Zea mays L.) were kept in glass vessels with 100 mL of aqueous solution spiked with potassium cyanide at 25±0.5 °C for 28 h. Four treatment concentrations of cyanide were used, ranging from 0.43 to 7.67 mg CN L-1. The disappearance of cyanide from the aqueous solution was analyzed spectrophotometrically. Realistic values of Km and vmax were estimated by a computer program using non-linear regression treatment. Lineweaver-Burk plots were also used to estimate the kinetic parameters for comparison. Using non-linear regression treatments, values of vmax and Km were found to be between 10.80 and 22.80 mg CN kg-1 h-1, and 2.57 and 7.09 mg CN L-1, respectively. The highest vmax was achieved by the cultivars HengFen 1, followed by NongDa 108. The lowest vmax was demonstrated by JingKe 8. The highest Km was found in NongDa 108, followed by HengFen 1. The lowest Km was associated with JingKe 8. Results from this study indicated that significant removal of cyanide from an aqueous solution was observed in the presence of plant materials without apparent phytotoxicity, even at the high concentration of cyanide used in this study. All maize cultivars used in this study were able to metabolize cyanide efficiently, although with different metabolic capacities. Results also showed a small variation of metabolic rates between the different cultivars. This leads to the conclusion that plants can be used as a phytoremediation agent in the detoxification of cyanide, presenting a feasible option for cleaning up soils and water contaminated with cyanide. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178996
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.13
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.229
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYu, XZen_US
dc.contributor.authorGu, JDen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:51:19Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:51:19Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.citationEcotoxicology And Environmental Safety, 2007, v. 67 n. 2, p. 254-259en_US
dc.identifier.issn0147-6513en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178996-
dc.description.abstractKnowledge of the kinetic parameters, the half-saturation constant (Km) and the maximum metabolic capacity (vmax), is very useful for the characterization of enzymes and biochemical processes. Little is known about rates of which vegetation metabolizes environmental chemicals. It is known, however, that vascular plants possess an enzyme system that detoxifies cyanide by converting it into the amino acid asparagine. This study investigated the differences in Michaelis-Menten kinetics of cyanide removal by different cultivars of maize. Detached leaves (1.0 g fresh weight) of seven different cultivars of maize (Zea mays L.) were kept in glass vessels with 100 mL of aqueous solution spiked with potassium cyanide at 25±0.5 °C for 28 h. Four treatment concentrations of cyanide were used, ranging from 0.43 to 7.67 mg CN L-1. The disappearance of cyanide from the aqueous solution was analyzed spectrophotometrically. Realistic values of Km and vmax were estimated by a computer program using non-linear regression treatment. Lineweaver-Burk plots were also used to estimate the kinetic parameters for comparison. Using non-linear regression treatments, values of vmax and Km were found to be between 10.80 and 22.80 mg CN kg-1 h-1, and 2.57 and 7.09 mg CN L-1, respectively. The highest vmax was achieved by the cultivars HengFen 1, followed by NongDa 108. The lowest vmax was demonstrated by JingKe 8. The highest Km was found in NongDa 108, followed by HengFen 1. The lowest Km was associated with JingKe 8. Results from this study indicated that significant removal of cyanide from an aqueous solution was observed in the presence of plant materials without apparent phytotoxicity, even at the high concentration of cyanide used in this study. All maize cultivars used in this study were able to metabolize cyanide efficiently, although with different metabolic capacities. Results also showed a small variation of metabolic rates between the different cultivars. This leads to the conclusion that plants can be used as a phytoremediation agent in the detoxification of cyanide, presenting a feasible option for cleaning up soils and water contaminated with cyanide. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecoenven_US
dc.relation.ispartofEcotoxicology and Environmental Safetyen_US
dc.subject.meshBiodegradation, Environmentalen_US
dc.subject.meshBiomassen_US
dc.subject.meshCyanides - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshEnvironmental Pollutants - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshKineticsen_US
dc.subject.meshLinear Modelsen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Biologicalen_US
dc.subject.meshPlant Leaves - Enzymology - Growth & Developmenten_US
dc.subject.meshZea Mays - Enzymology - Growth & Developmenten_US
dc.titleDifferences in Michaelis-Menten kinetics for different cultivars of maize during cyanide removalen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGu, JD: jdgu@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGu, JD=rp00701en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecoenv.2006.06.009en_US
dc.identifier.pmid17064775-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-34247630027en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros134267-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-34247630027&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume67en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage254en_US
dc.identifier.epage259en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000247328900010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYu, XZ=24449490500en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, JD=7403129601en_US

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