File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Demographic mechanisms of the population decline of the song thrush Turdus philomelos in Britain

TitleDemographic mechanisms of the population decline of the song thrush Turdus philomelos in Britain
Authors
KeywordsDemographic Models
Juvenile Mortality
Population Change
Ringing Recoveries
Survival Rates
Issue Date2004
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JAE
Citation
Journal Of Animal Ecology, 2004, v. 73 n. 4, p. 670-682 How to Cite?
Abstract1. In Britain, the song thrush Turdus philomelos is categorized as a species of high national conservation concern because of a large population decline during the last three decades. We calculated a series of annual national population estimates for woodland and farmland habitats combined for the period 1964-2000. We then used turning points analysis to identify seven blocks of years within the period of decline (1968-2000) with uniform rates of population change in the smoothed trend. 2. We used recoveries of song thrushes ringed as nestlings, juveniles and adults during April-September to estimate survival rates separately for the post-fledging period, the remainder of the first year and for adults. Daily survival probability was lower during the post-fledging period than during the remainder of the first year or for older birds. 3. There was evidence for variation in survival rates among blocks of years with different rates of population change, particularly for first-year survival. There were significant positive correlations across blocks between mean population multiplication rate (PMR) and both post-fledging and first-year survival. 4. Survival of first-year birds was correlated negatively with the duration of the longest run of frost days and the survival of adults was correlated negatively with the duration of the longest summer drought. Variation among blocks in mean PMR was correlated with block means of the duration of runs of frost days and drought days, but significant correlations between PMR and both post-fledging and first-year survival remained after allowing for the influence of weather on survival. 5. Changes in survival in the first winter, and perhaps also the post-fledging period, are sufficient to have caused the song thrush population decline. The environmental causes of these changes are not known, but changes in farming practices, land drainage, pesticides and predators are all candidates. Adverse weather conditions contributed to the decline, but were not the primary driver.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178927
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.827
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.359
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, RAen_US
dc.contributor.authorGreen, REen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaillie, SRen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeach, WJen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomson, DLen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:50:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:50:47Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Animal Ecology, 2004, v. 73 n. 4, p. 670-682en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-8790en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178927-
dc.description.abstract1. In Britain, the song thrush Turdus philomelos is categorized as a species of high national conservation concern because of a large population decline during the last three decades. We calculated a series of annual national population estimates for woodland and farmland habitats combined for the period 1964-2000. We then used turning points analysis to identify seven blocks of years within the period of decline (1968-2000) with uniform rates of population change in the smoothed trend. 2. We used recoveries of song thrushes ringed as nestlings, juveniles and adults during April-September to estimate survival rates separately for the post-fledging period, the remainder of the first year and for adults. Daily survival probability was lower during the post-fledging period than during the remainder of the first year or for older birds. 3. There was evidence for variation in survival rates among blocks of years with different rates of population change, particularly for first-year survival. There were significant positive correlations across blocks between mean population multiplication rate (PMR) and both post-fledging and first-year survival. 4. Survival of first-year birds was correlated negatively with the duration of the longest run of frost days and the survival of adults was correlated negatively with the duration of the longest summer drought. Variation among blocks in mean PMR was correlated with block means of the duration of runs of frost days and drought days, but significant correlations between PMR and both post-fledging and first-year survival remained after allowing for the influence of weather on survival. 5. Changes in survival in the first winter, and perhaps also the post-fledging period, are sufficient to have caused the song thrush population decline. The environmental causes of these changes are not known, but changes in farming practices, land drainage, pesticides and predators are all candidates. Adverse weather conditions contributed to the decline, but were not the primary driver.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JAEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Animal Ecologyen_US
dc.subjectDemographic Modelsen_US
dc.subjectJuvenile Mortalityen_US
dc.subjectPopulation Changeen_US
dc.subjectRinging Recoveriesen_US
dc.subjectSurvival Ratesen_US
dc.titleDemographic mechanisms of the population decline of the song thrush Turdus philomelos in Britainen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailThomson, DL: dthomson@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityThomson, DL=rp00788en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.0021-8790.2004.00841.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-3142712556en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-3142712556&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume73en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage670en_US
dc.identifier.epage682en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222051300007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridRobinson, RA=7403880221en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGreen, RE=7403916297en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaillie, SR=7005297384en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeach, WJ=7003836801en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomson, DL=7202586830en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats