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Article: Oil and Squalene in Amaranthus Grain and Leaf

TitleOil and Squalene in Amaranthus Grain and Leaf
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jafcau
Citation
Journal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry, 2003, v. 51 n. 27, p. 7913-7920 How to Cite?
AbstractAmaranthus grain of 104 genotypes from 30 species was investigated for oil and squalene contents and fatty acid profiles. The overall average oil content in Amaranthus grain was 5.0%, ranging from 1.9 to 8.7%. Squalene concentration in extracted oils ranged from trace to 7.3%, with an average concentration of 4.2%. The average contents of three major fatty acids in Amaranthus grain were 22.2, 29.1, and 44.6% for palmitic, oleic, and linoleic, respectively. The average fat content in dried mature leaves of 45 Amaranthus genotypes was 1.63%, ranging from 1.08 to 2.18%. The squalene concentration in leaf lipid extracts averaged 0.26%, ranging from trace to 0.77%, which is much lower than that from seeds. The major fatty acids of leaf extracts were linolenic, linoleic, and palmitic. Linolenic ranged from 56.5 to 62.0% of total fatty acids; linoleic, from 15.5 to 24.7%; and palmitic acid, from 13.5 to 15.5%. As for the fatty acid compositions at different growth stages, fatty acid content in leaf lipid was lower in mature leaves than in young leaves. The saturated/unsaturated ratio decreased when the leaf grew to maturity. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on compositional characteristics of grain. The first two components accounted for 70% of the total variance (38.3 and 21.7%, respectively). There was a positive correlation between oil content and squalene yield, and a negative correlations were found between linoleic and either of the other two major fatty acids, palmitic and oleic. The taxonomic relationship among the species was also elucidated by PCA.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178842
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.857
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.246
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHe, HPen_US
dc.contributor.authorCorke, Hen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:50:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:50:04Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Agricultural And Food Chemistry, 2003, v. 51 n. 27, p. 7913-7920en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-8561en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178842-
dc.description.abstractAmaranthus grain of 104 genotypes from 30 species was investigated for oil and squalene contents and fatty acid profiles. The overall average oil content in Amaranthus grain was 5.0%, ranging from 1.9 to 8.7%. Squalene concentration in extracted oils ranged from trace to 7.3%, with an average concentration of 4.2%. The average contents of three major fatty acids in Amaranthus grain were 22.2, 29.1, and 44.6% for palmitic, oleic, and linoleic, respectively. The average fat content in dried mature leaves of 45 Amaranthus genotypes was 1.63%, ranging from 1.08 to 2.18%. The squalene concentration in leaf lipid extracts averaged 0.26%, ranging from trace to 0.77%, which is much lower than that from seeds. The major fatty acids of leaf extracts were linolenic, linoleic, and palmitic. Linolenic ranged from 56.5 to 62.0% of total fatty acids; linoleic, from 15.5 to 24.7%; and palmitic acid, from 13.5 to 15.5%. As for the fatty acid compositions at different growth stages, fatty acid content in leaf lipid was lower in mature leaves than in young leaves. The saturated/unsaturated ratio decreased when the leaf grew to maturity. Principal component analysis (PCA) was carried out on compositional characteristics of grain. The first two components accounted for 70% of the total variance (38.3 and 21.7%, respectively). There was a positive correlation between oil content and squalene yield, and a negative correlations were found between linoleic and either of the other two major fatty acids, palmitic and oleic. The taxonomic relationship among the species was also elucidated by PCA.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://pubs.acs.org/journal/jafcauen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Agricultural and Food Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshAmaranthus - Chemistry - Geneticsen_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshGenotypeen_US
dc.subject.meshLinoleic Acid - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshOleic Acid - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshPalmitic Acid - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshPlant Extracts - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshPlant Leaves - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshPlant Oils - Analysisen_US
dc.subject.meshSeeds - Chemistryen_US
dc.subject.meshSqualene - Analysisen_US
dc.titleOil and Squalene in Amaranthus Grain and Leafen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailCorke, H: harold@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityCorke, H=rp00688en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1021/jf030489qen_US
dc.identifier.pmid14690373-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0348226958en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0348226958&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume51en_US
dc.identifier.issue27en_US
dc.identifier.spage7913en_US
dc.identifier.epage7920en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000187565600013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHe, HP=55214942000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCorke, H=7007102942en_US

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