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Article: Energy content at metamorphosis and growth rate of the early juvenile barnacle Balanus amphitrite

TitleEnergy content at metamorphosis and growth rate of the early juvenile barnacle Balanus amphitrite
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00227/index.htm
Citation
Marine Biology, 2003, v. 143 n. 3, p. 543-554 How to Cite?
AbstractThe energetic cost of metamorphosis in cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite Darwin was estimated by quantification of lipid, carbohydrate and protein contents. About 38-58% (4-5 mJ individual-1) of cypris energy reserves were used during metamorphosis. Lipids accounted for 55-65%, proteins for 34-44% and carbohydrates for <2% of the energy used. Juveniles obtained from larvae fed 106 cells ml-1 of Chaetoceros gracilis were bigger (carapace length: 560-616 μm) and contained more energy (5.56 ± 0.10 mJ juvenile-1) than their counterparts (carapace length: 420-462 μm; energy content: 2.49 ± 0.20 mJ juvenile -1) obtained from larvae fed 104 cells ml-1. At water temperatures of 30°C and 24°C and food concentrations of 104 and 102 cells ml-1 (3:1 mixture of C. gracilis and Isochrysis galbana) as well as under field conditions (26.9 ± 3.1°C and 2.2 ± 0.8 μg chlorophyll a 1-1), juveniles obtained from larvae fed the high food concentration grew faster than juveniles obtained from larvae fed low food concentration until 5 days post-metamorphosis. Laboratory experiments revealed a combined effect of early juvenile energy content, temperature and food concentration on growth until 5 days post-metamorphosis. After 10 days post-metamorphosis, the influence of the early juvenile energy content on growth became negligible. Overall, our results indicate that the energy content at metamorphosis is of critical importance for initial growth of juvenile barnacles and emphasize the dependency of the physiological performance of early juvenile barnacles on the larval exposure to food.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178816
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.375
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.302
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThiyagarajan, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorHarder, Ten_US
dc.contributor.authorQiu, JWen_US
dc.contributor.authorQian, PYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:49:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:49:54Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationMarine Biology, 2003, v. 143 n. 3, p. 543-554en_US
dc.identifier.issn0025-3162en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178816-
dc.description.abstractThe energetic cost of metamorphosis in cyprids of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite Darwin was estimated by quantification of lipid, carbohydrate and protein contents. About 38-58% (4-5 mJ individual-1) of cypris energy reserves were used during metamorphosis. Lipids accounted for 55-65%, proteins for 34-44% and carbohydrates for <2% of the energy used. Juveniles obtained from larvae fed 106 cells ml-1 of Chaetoceros gracilis were bigger (carapace length: 560-616 μm) and contained more energy (5.56 ± 0.10 mJ juvenile-1) than their counterparts (carapace length: 420-462 μm; energy content: 2.49 ± 0.20 mJ juvenile -1) obtained from larvae fed 104 cells ml-1. At water temperatures of 30°C and 24°C and food concentrations of 104 and 102 cells ml-1 (3:1 mixture of C. gracilis and Isochrysis galbana) as well as under field conditions (26.9 ± 3.1°C and 2.2 ± 0.8 μg chlorophyll a 1-1), juveniles obtained from larvae fed the high food concentration grew faster than juveniles obtained from larvae fed low food concentration until 5 days post-metamorphosis. Laboratory experiments revealed a combined effect of early juvenile energy content, temperature and food concentration on growth until 5 days post-metamorphosis. After 10 days post-metamorphosis, the influence of the early juvenile energy content on growth became negligible. Overall, our results indicate that the energy content at metamorphosis is of critical importance for initial growth of juvenile barnacles and emphasize the dependency of the physiological performance of early juvenile barnacles on the larval exposure to food.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00227/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofMarine Biologyen_US
dc.titleEnergy content at metamorphosis and growth rate of the early juvenile barnacle Balanus amphitriteen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailThiyagarajan, V: rajan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityThiyagarajan, V=rp00796en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00227-003-1077-9en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0142060872en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0142060872&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume143en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage543en_US
dc.identifier.epage554en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000185672200014-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThiyagarajan, V=6602476830en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHarder, T=7102369515en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQiu, JW=7403309861en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQian, PY=35240648600en_US

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