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Article: Development of a marine subtidal epibiotic community in Hong Kong: Implications for deployment of artificial reefs

TitleDevelopment of a marine subtidal epibiotic community in Hong Kong: Implications for deployment of artificial reefs
Authors
Issue Date2003
PublisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08927014.asp
Citation
Biofouling, 2003, v. 19 n. 1, p. 37-46 How to Cite?
AbstractA 2-year study was conducted in Hong Kong to examine the effects of substratum, season and length of submersion on the development of a subtidal epibiotic community using four types of settlement panels (concrete, steel, wood and tyre). The season and length of submersion had a strong influence on the total biomass and on community structure while the type of substratum had very little impact on the total biomass or the structure of the epibiotic community. The season of submersion determined the species composition of the newly submerged surfaces. In the spring and summer, tubeworms were the most abundant. In the autumn and winter, barnacles and tunicates dominated. Community succession was not obvious in the first year of submersion as it was intermingled with strong seasonal settlement, growth and death of barnacles and tunicates. In the second year of submersion, green mussels and tunicates settled and grew to occupy most of the panel surfaces, forming an assemblage that was characteristic of climax communities in the local subtidal waters. The results suggest that the type of construction material has limited impact on the development of epibiotic communities on artificial reefs deployed in Hong Kong; the season of submersion may affect community structure in the early successional stage, but not the characteristics of the climax communities. This study indicates that the type of substratum should not be of concern when deploying artificial reefs in the subtidal waters in this region. The design of artificial reefs should focus more on other physical and economical aspects such as durability, flow dynamics, stability, cost, and effects on the ambient environment.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178787
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.0
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.219
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQiu, JWen_US
dc.contributor.authorThiyagarajan, Ven_US
dc.contributor.authorLeung, AWYen_US
dc.contributor.authorQian, PYen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:49:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:49:45Z-
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.identifier.citationBiofouling, 2003, v. 19 n. 1, p. 37-46en_US
dc.identifier.issn0892-7014en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178787-
dc.description.abstractA 2-year study was conducted in Hong Kong to examine the effects of substratum, season and length of submersion on the development of a subtidal epibiotic community using four types of settlement panels (concrete, steel, wood and tyre). The season and length of submersion had a strong influence on the total biomass and on community structure while the type of substratum had very little impact on the total biomass or the structure of the epibiotic community. The season of submersion determined the species composition of the newly submerged surfaces. In the spring and summer, tubeworms were the most abundant. In the autumn and winter, barnacles and tunicates dominated. Community succession was not obvious in the first year of submersion as it was intermingled with strong seasonal settlement, growth and death of barnacles and tunicates. In the second year of submersion, green mussels and tunicates settled and grew to occupy most of the panel surfaces, forming an assemblage that was characteristic of climax communities in the local subtidal waters. The results suggest that the type of construction material has limited impact on the development of epibiotic communities on artificial reefs deployed in Hong Kong; the season of submersion may affect community structure in the early successional stage, but not the characteristics of the climax communities. This study indicates that the type of substratum should not be of concern when deploying artificial reefs in the subtidal waters in this region. The design of artificial reefs should focus more on other physical and economical aspects such as durability, flow dynamics, stability, cost, and effects on the ambient environment.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08927014.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofBiofoulingen_US
dc.subject.meshAnalysis Of Varianceen_US
dc.subject.meshBiomassen_US
dc.subject.meshEcosystemen_US
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_US
dc.subject.meshManufactured Materialsen_US
dc.subject.meshMarine Biologyen_US
dc.subject.meshOceans And Seasen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Dynamicsen_US
dc.subject.meshSeasonsen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of a marine subtidal epibiotic community in Hong Kong: Implications for deployment of artificial reefsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailThiyagarajan, V: rajan@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityThiyagarajan, V=rp00796en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/0892701021000060851en_US
dc.identifier.pmid14618687-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037312964en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037312964&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume19en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage37en_US
dc.identifier.epage46en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000179778300004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQiu, JW=7403309861en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThiyagarajan, V=6602476830en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, AWY=7403012497en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridQian, PY=35240648600en_US

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