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Article: Sex differences in emigration and mortality affect optimal management of deer populations

TitleSex differences in emigration and mortality affect optimal management of deer populations
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/nature
Citation
Nature, 2002, v. 415 n. 6872, p. 633-637 How to Cite?
AbstractPopulations of red deer that are limited by food, like those of many other ungulates, commonly include more females than males. We assessed the contribution of variation in sex- and age-specific rates of mortality and emigration to density-dependent changes in the adult sex ratio, using long-term observations and demographic experiments involving the red deer population on Rum, Scotland. We incorporated these effects in a stochastic model of local populations under different management regimes to show here that, when female numbers are allowed to increase to more than 60% of the ecological carrying capacity, the sustainable annual harvest of males from local deer populations will fall. Because males are typically culled by fee-paying hunters and generate more income than females, income will decrease as the male harvest falls. Because numbers of female deer throughout much of the Highlands probably exceed the threshold at which male density starts to be affected, many managers might be able to raise income from local deer populations by reducing female numbers, with potential benefits to the vegetation of Scottish Highland environments.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178780
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 38.138
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 21.936
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCluttonBrock, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoulson, TNen_US
dc.contributor.authorMilnerGuiland, EJen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Den_US
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, HMen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:49:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:49:43Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationNature, 2002, v. 415 n. 6872, p. 633-637en_US
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178780-
dc.description.abstractPopulations of red deer that are limited by food, like those of many other ungulates, commonly include more females than males. We assessed the contribution of variation in sex- and age-specific rates of mortality and emigration to density-dependent changes in the adult sex ratio, using long-term observations and demographic experiments involving the red deer population on Rum, Scotland. We incorporated these effects in a stochastic model of local populations under different management regimes to show here that, when female numbers are allowed to increase to more than 60% of the ecological carrying capacity, the sustainable annual harvest of males from local deer populations will fall. Because males are typically culled by fee-paying hunters and generate more income than females, income will decrease as the male harvest falls. Because numbers of female deer throughout much of the Highlands probably exceed the threshold at which male density starts to be affected, many managers might be able to raise income from local deer populations by reducing female numbers, with potential benefits to the vegetation of Scottish Highland environments.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/natureen_US
dc.relation.ispartofNatureen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshDeer - Physiologyen_US
dc.subject.meshEcologyen_US
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_US
dc.subject.meshHoming Behavioren_US
dc.subject.meshLongevityen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Densityen_US
dc.subject.meshScotlanden_US
dc.subject.meshSex Ratioen_US
dc.subject.meshStochastic Processesen_US
dc.titleSex differences in emigration and mortality affect optimal management of deer populationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailThomson, D: dthomson@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityThomson, D=rp00788en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/415633aen_US
dc.identifier.pmid11832944-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0037034003en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0037034003&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume415en_US
dc.identifier.issue6872en_US
dc.identifier.spage633en_US
dc.identifier.epage637en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000173709100044-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCluttonBrock, TH=7005942965en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCoulson, TN=7003738447en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMilnerGuiland, EJ=6505760740en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomson, D=7202586830en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridArmstrong, HM=7006223825en_US

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