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Article: Conservation and management of humpback dolphins: The South African perspective

TitleConservation and management of humpback dolphins: The South African perspective
Authors
KeywordsAlgoa Bay
Conservation
Humpback Dolphins
Indian Ocean
Integrated Coastal Zone Management
Sousa Chinensis
South Africa
Issue Date2000
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://uk.cambridge.org/journals/journal_catalogue.asp?historylinks=ALPHA&mnemonic=ORX
Citation
Oryx, 2000, v. 34 n. 3, p. 207-216 How to Cite?
AbstractPopulation biology and socio-ecology of Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins Sousa chinensis were investigated during a 3-year study period in the Algoa Bay region, South Africa. The dolphins inhabit a narrow strip of coastal waters, mostly less than 15 m deep. Groups are small (mean = 7 animals) and their daily activities concentrate around shallow rocky reefs-the primary feeding grounds. Dependence on these restricted, shallow-water habitats is evident throughout the year. Site fidelity is generally weak and is subject to seasonal migration, although female site fidelity seems to be related to reproductive stage. Births occur predominantly in summer. The social system is highly fluid, structured to some degree by sex and age, 'matesearching' behavior being the most likely male reproductive strategy. The dolphins inhabiting Algoa Bay are part of a substantially larger population that uses a considerable length of the coastal zone. Estimated population parameters are generally low, as are modelled population growth rates, and an increase in the population size seems unlikely. Humpback dolphins appear to be vulnerable to negative environmental pressure and the alteration/destruction of inshore habitats is probably among the greatest threats to them. Conservation of this species should be given high priority and be seen as an important part of integrated coastal zone management. Establishment of multiple-use management areas with controlled ecotourism and several priority sites declared as strict reserves seems to be the most effective conservation approach. In order to be successful, conservation and management policies need to recognize the needs and lifestyles of the local inhabitants.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178698
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.052
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.952
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKarczmarski, Len_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:49:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:49:12Z-
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.identifier.citationOryx, 2000, v. 34 n. 3, p. 207-216en_US
dc.identifier.issn0030-6053en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178698-
dc.description.abstractPopulation biology and socio-ecology of Indo-Pacific humpback dolphins Sousa chinensis were investigated during a 3-year study period in the Algoa Bay region, South Africa. The dolphins inhabit a narrow strip of coastal waters, mostly less than 15 m deep. Groups are small (mean = 7 animals) and their daily activities concentrate around shallow rocky reefs-the primary feeding grounds. Dependence on these restricted, shallow-water habitats is evident throughout the year. Site fidelity is generally weak and is subject to seasonal migration, although female site fidelity seems to be related to reproductive stage. Births occur predominantly in summer. The social system is highly fluid, structured to some degree by sex and age, 'matesearching' behavior being the most likely male reproductive strategy. The dolphins inhabiting Algoa Bay are part of a substantially larger population that uses a considerable length of the coastal zone. Estimated population parameters are generally low, as are modelled population growth rates, and an increase in the population size seems unlikely. Humpback dolphins appear to be vulnerable to negative environmental pressure and the alteration/destruction of inshore habitats is probably among the greatest threats to them. Conservation of this species should be given high priority and be seen as an important part of integrated coastal zone management. Establishment of multiple-use management areas with controlled ecotourism and several priority sites declared as strict reserves seems to be the most effective conservation approach. In order to be successful, conservation and management policies need to recognize the needs and lifestyles of the local inhabitants.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://uk.cambridge.org/journals/journal_catalogue.asp?historylinks=ALPHA&mnemonic=ORXen_US
dc.relation.ispartofORYXen_US
dc.subjectAlgoa Bayen_US
dc.subjectConservationen_US
dc.subjectHumpback Dolphinsen_US
dc.subjectIndian Oceanen_US
dc.subjectIntegrated Coastal Zone Managementen_US
dc.subjectSousa Chinensisen_US
dc.subjectSouth Africaen_US
dc.titleConservation and management of humpback dolphins: The South African perspectiveen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailKarczmarski, L: leszek@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityKarczmarski, L=rp00713en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-3008.2000.00120.xen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033860078en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033860078&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume34en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage207en_US
dc.identifier.epage216en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000088939000009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKarczmarski, L=6603422145en_US

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