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Article: Habitat segregation in ungulates: Are males forced into suboptimal foraging habitats through indirect competition by females?

TitleHabitat segregation in ungulates: Are males forced into suboptimal foraging habitats through indirect competition by females?
Authors
KeywordsBody Size Dimorphism
Grazing Behaviour
Herbivore Ecology
Jarman-Bell Principle
Sexual Segregation
Issue Date1999
PublisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00442/index.htm
Citation
Oecologia, 1999, v. 119 n. 3, p. 367-377 How to Cite?
AbstractSex differences in habitat use (termed 'habitat segregation') are widespread in sexually dimorphic ungulate species. They are a puzzling phenomenon, particularly when females use better foraging habitats than males. It has been suggested that males, owing to their larger body size and higher forage requirements, are inferior in indirect competition to females and are forced by female grazing pressure into marginal habitats ('indirect-competition hypothesis'). This hypothesis has been widely cited and has important theoretical and practical implications. However, evidence for it is inconclusive. The present paper presents the results of the first experimental test of the indirect-competition hypothesis. We manipulated female and male numbers of red deer (Cervus elaphus L.) on a large scale on the Isle of Rum, Scotland, and tested the influence of this manipulation on deer habitat use. We predicted that where female numbers were reduced, male use of preferred habitat should increase and sex differences in habitat use should decrease, while a reduction in male numbers should not have such effects. In contrast, we found that the manipulation of female and male numbers did not affect habitat use, and conclude that the indirect-competition hypothesis does not explain habitat segregation on Rum.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178673
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.902
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.985
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorConradt, Len_US
dc.contributor.authorCluttonBrock, THen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:49:04Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:49:04Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationOecologia, 1999, v. 119 n. 3, p. 367-377en_US
dc.identifier.issn0029-8549en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178673-
dc.description.abstractSex differences in habitat use (termed 'habitat segregation') are widespread in sexually dimorphic ungulate species. They are a puzzling phenomenon, particularly when females use better foraging habitats than males. It has been suggested that males, owing to their larger body size and higher forage requirements, are inferior in indirect competition to females and are forced by female grazing pressure into marginal habitats ('indirect-competition hypothesis'). This hypothesis has been widely cited and has important theoretical and practical implications. However, evidence for it is inconclusive. The present paper presents the results of the first experimental test of the indirect-competition hypothesis. We manipulated female and male numbers of red deer (Cervus elaphus L.) on a large scale on the Isle of Rum, Scotland, and tested the influence of this manipulation on deer habitat use. We predicted that where female numbers were reduced, male use of preferred habitat should increase and sex differences in habitat use should decrease, while a reduction in male numbers should not have such effects. In contrast, we found that the manipulation of female and male numbers did not affect habitat use, and conclude that the indirect-competition hypothesis does not explain habitat segregation on Rum.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00442/index.htmen_US
dc.relation.ispartofOecologiaen_US
dc.subjectBody Size Dimorphismen_US
dc.subjectGrazing Behaviouren_US
dc.subjectHerbivore Ecologyen_US
dc.subjectJarman-Bell Principleen_US
dc.subjectSexual Segregationen_US
dc.titleHabitat segregation in ungulates: Are males forced into suboptimal foraging habitats through indirect competition by females?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailThomson, D: dthomson@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityThomson, D=rp00788en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s004420050797en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033034706en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033034706&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume119en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage367en_US
dc.identifier.epage377en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000080589800009-
dc.publisher.placeGermanyen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridConradt, L=6701668951en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCluttonBrock, TH=7005942965en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomson, D=7202586830en_US

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