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Article: Oxidized cholesterol in oxidized low density lipoprotein may be responsible for the inhibition of LPS-induced nitric oxide production in macrophages

TitleOxidized cholesterol in oxidized low density lipoprotein may be responsible for the inhibition of LPS-induced nitric oxide production in macrophages
Authors
Issue Date1998
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atherosclerosis
Citation
Atherosclerosis, 1998, v. 136 n. 1, p. 43-49 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious work has shown that oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages. In this paper, the role of different components of Ox-LDL in the inhibitory effect was studied by measuring nitrite in media. Ox-LDL inhibited LPS-induced NO production in macrophage cell line J774.A1. When compared with Ox-LDL, native and acetylated LDL had a lesser effect on NO production. Pre- clearance of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) in Ox-LDL and removal of soluble thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in Ox-LDL solution by dialysis had no influence on the inhibitory effect Of Ox-LDL. The protein moiety of Ox-LDL had no effect on NO production, but the lipid moiety inhibited NO production to about the same extent as intact Ox-LDL. Linoleic acid and phosphatidylcholine, the main components of LDL lipid, whether oxidized separately or together, had no effect On NO production. However, if linoleic acid and cholesterol oxidized together, there was very strong inhibition of NO production. Cholesterol oxidized alone also had some inhibitory effect. These results suggest that oxidized cholesterol in Ox-LDL might be responsible for the inhibition of NO production in macrophages.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178621
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.942
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.819
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, SXen_US
dc.contributor.authorChen, Yen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWan, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:48:46Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:48:46Z-
dc.date.issued1998en_US
dc.identifier.citationAtherosclerosis, 1998, v. 136 n. 1, p. 43-49en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-9150en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178621-
dc.description.abstractPrevious work has shown that oxidized low density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) inhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced nitric oxide (NO) production in macrophages. In this paper, the role of different components of Ox-LDL in the inhibitory effect was studied by measuring nitrite in media. Ox-LDL inhibited LPS-induced NO production in macrophage cell line J774.A1. When compared with Ox-LDL, native and acetylated LDL had a lesser effect on NO production. Pre- clearance of lipid hydroperoxides (LOOH) in Ox-LDL and removal of soluble thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) in Ox-LDL solution by dialysis had no influence on the inhibitory effect Of Ox-LDL. The protein moiety of Ox-LDL had no effect on NO production, but the lipid moiety inhibited NO production to about the same extent as intact Ox-LDL. Linoleic acid and phosphatidylcholine, the main components of LDL lipid, whether oxidized separately or together, had no effect On NO production. However, if linoleic acid and cholesterol oxidized together, there was very strong inhibition of NO production. Cholesterol oxidized alone also had some inhibitory effect. These results suggest that oxidized cholesterol in Ox-LDL might be responsible for the inhibition of NO production in macrophages.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/atherosclerosisen_US
dc.relation.ispartofAtherosclerosisen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshCell Lineen_US
dc.subject.meshCholesterol - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshLinoleic Acid - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshLipopolysaccharides - Pharmacologyen_US
dc.subject.meshLipoproteins, Ldl - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshMacrophages - Drug Effects - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshMiceen_US
dc.subject.meshNitric Oxide - Biosynthesisen_US
dc.subject.meshOxidation-Reductionen_US
dc.subject.meshPhosphatidylcholines - Metabolismen_US
dc.subject.meshThiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances - Metabolismen_US
dc.titleOxidized cholesterol in oxidized low density lipoprotein may be responsible for the inhibition of LPS-induced nitric oxide production in macrophagesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailWan, J: jmfwan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityWan, J=rp00798en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0021-9150(97)00185-8en_US
dc.identifier.pmid9544730-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0031822451en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0031822451&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume136en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage43en_US
dc.identifier.epage49en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000072378900006-
dc.publisher.placeIrelanden_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLiu, SX=7409463469en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChen, Y=16745998900en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhou, M=7403506134en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWan, J=8930305000en_US

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