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Article: The demography and age-specific annual survival of song thrushes during periods of population stability and decline

TitleThe demography and age-specific annual survival of song thrushes during periods of population stability and decline
Authors
KeywordsAge-Class
First Year Survival
Mortality Rates
Ringing Recoveries
Weather
Issue Date1997
PublisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JAE
Citation
Journal Of Animal Ecology, 1997, v. 66 n. 3, p. 414-424 How to Cite?
Abstract1. The British song thrush (Turdus philomelos Brehm) population suffered a marked decline between 1975 and 1993, falling by 65% at an average rate of 5.7% per annum on farmland. We used ring recoveries to investigate whether this could have been brought about by changes in annual survival probabilities of fully grown birds. 2. The annual survival probabilities of first-year song thrushes averaged 0.484 prior to the population decline (1962-75), but dropped to an average of 0.405 in the years 1975-93. A long-term non-linear decrease accounted for 32% of the variance in the logit-transformed estimates of first-year annual survival probability. Adult annual survival probabilities did not show a similar decline; they increased then decreased over the same period, with 28% of this variance being described by a quadratic equation. 3. The changes in first-year annual survival probabilities alone were sufficiently large to account for the observed changes in population size. 4. First year annual survival probabilities were lower in years with cold (r2 = 11%) or dry (r2 = 20%) winters and together with the long-term decrease these effects explained 49% of the variance in the logit-transformed estimates of first-year annual survival probability. Adult annual survival probabilities were lower in years with cold winters (r2 = 34%), and together with the long-term trend, this accounted for 51% of the variance. These relationships with weather conditions explained part of the variation about the long-term trends but did not explain the trends themselves. 5. This study demonstrates that an Integrated Population Monitoring Programme can not only alert conservationists to declining species but also elucidate the demographic processes underlying population declines on a national scale.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178596
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.827
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.359
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorThomson, DLen_US
dc.contributor.authorBaillie, SRen_US
dc.contributor.authorPeach, WJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:48:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:48:34Z-
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Animal Ecology, 1997, v. 66 n. 3, p. 414-424en_US
dc.identifier.issn0021-8790en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178596-
dc.description.abstract1. The British song thrush (Turdus philomelos Brehm) population suffered a marked decline between 1975 and 1993, falling by 65% at an average rate of 5.7% per annum on farmland. We used ring recoveries to investigate whether this could have been brought about by changes in annual survival probabilities of fully grown birds. 2. The annual survival probabilities of first-year song thrushes averaged 0.484 prior to the population decline (1962-75), but dropped to an average of 0.405 in the years 1975-93. A long-term non-linear decrease accounted for 32% of the variance in the logit-transformed estimates of first-year annual survival probability. Adult annual survival probabilities did not show a similar decline; they increased then decreased over the same period, with 28% of this variance being described by a quadratic equation. 3. The changes in first-year annual survival probabilities alone were sufficiently large to account for the observed changes in population size. 4. First year annual survival probabilities were lower in years with cold (r2 = 11%) or dry (r2 = 20%) winters and together with the long-term decrease these effects explained 49% of the variance in the logit-transformed estimates of first-year annual survival probability. Adult annual survival probabilities were lower in years with cold winters (r2 = 34%), and together with the long-term trend, this accounted for 51% of the variance. These relationships with weather conditions explained part of the variation about the long-term trends but did not explain the trends themselves. 5. This study demonstrates that an Integrated Population Monitoring Programme can not only alert conservationists to declining species but also elucidate the demographic processes underlying population declines on a national scale.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journals/JAEen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Animal Ecologyen_US
dc.subjectAge-Classen_US
dc.subjectFirst Year Survivalen_US
dc.subjectMortality Ratesen_US
dc.subjectRinging Recoveriesen_US
dc.subjectWeatheren_US
dc.titleThe demography and age-specific annual survival of song thrushes during periods of population stability and declineen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailThomson, DL: dthomson@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityThomson, DL=rp00788en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030619977en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030619977&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume66en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage414en_US
dc.identifier.epage424en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomson, DL=7202586830en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridBaillie, SR=7005297384en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridPeach, WJ=7003836801en_US

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