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Article: Seasonal dynamics of invertebrate drift in a Hong Kong stream

TitleSeasonal dynamics of invertebrate drift in a Hong Kong stream
Authors
Issue Date1990
Citation
Journal Of Zoology, 1990, v. 222 n. 2, p. 187-196 How to Cite?
AbstractIn Tai Po Kau Forest Stream, mean drift density was 277.9 ± 25.0 individuals 100 m-3; peaks in density were apparent during autumn and spring. Some 102 taxa were recovered from the drift; total number of taxa was positively related to water temperatures. Over 99% of the aquatic animals collected in drift samples were insects, 10 taxa of which constituted 67.3% of the entire catch. Baetid mayflies dominated the composition of the drift, comprising 40.4% of individuals caught. Seasonal changes in the drift of individual taxa were evident, reflecting significant relationships between drift densities and water temperature: Simulium T1 (Diptera), Anisocentropus maculatus (Trichoptera) and Amphinemura chui (Plecoptera) drifted most in winter, whereas Chimarra T1, Polymorphanisus astictus (Trichoptera), Helodes sp l and cf. Rhantus sp. (Coleoptera) were most numerous in summer. Drifting mayflies showed spring (Indobaetis sp., Cinygmina T1, Serratella T2), autumn (Baetiella sp., Pseudocloeon T2), or spring and autumn (Baetis nr pseudofrequentus) peaks which were not clearly related to water temperature. In only A. maculatus and P. astictus was drift seasonality associated with life-cycle events. Overall, there was no evidence of community-level trends in the periodicity of stream drift in this seasonal tropical habitat. -from Author
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178502
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.819
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DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDudgeon, Den_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:48:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:48:03Z-
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Zoology, 1990, v. 222 n. 2, p. 187-196en_US
dc.identifier.issn0952-8369en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178502-
dc.description.abstractIn Tai Po Kau Forest Stream, mean drift density was 277.9 ± 25.0 individuals 100 m-3; peaks in density were apparent during autumn and spring. Some 102 taxa were recovered from the drift; total number of taxa was positively related to water temperatures. Over 99% of the aquatic animals collected in drift samples were insects, 10 taxa of which constituted 67.3% of the entire catch. Baetid mayflies dominated the composition of the drift, comprising 40.4% of individuals caught. Seasonal changes in the drift of individual taxa were evident, reflecting significant relationships between drift densities and water temperature: Simulium T1 (Diptera), Anisocentropus maculatus (Trichoptera) and Amphinemura chui (Plecoptera) drifted most in winter, whereas Chimarra T1, Polymorphanisus astictus (Trichoptera), Helodes sp l and cf. Rhantus sp. (Coleoptera) were most numerous in summer. Drifting mayflies showed spring (Indobaetis sp., Cinygmina T1, Serratella T2), autumn (Baetiella sp., Pseudocloeon T2), or spring and autumn (Baetis nr pseudofrequentus) peaks which were not clearly related to water temperature. In only A. maculatus and P. astictus was drift seasonality associated with life-cycle events. Overall, there was no evidence of community-level trends in the periodicity of stream drift in this seasonal tropical habitat. -from Authoren_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Zoologyen_US
dc.titleSeasonal dynamics of invertebrate drift in a Hong Kong streamen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDudgeon, D: ddudgeon@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDudgeon, D=rp00691en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0025640453en_US
dc.identifier.volume222en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage187en_US
dc.identifier.epage196en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDudgeon, D=7006559840en_US

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