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Article: Rapid production of advanced atherosclerosis in swine by a combination of endothelial injury and cholesterol feeding

TitleRapid production of advanced atherosclerosis in swine by a combination of endothelial injury and cholesterol feeding
Authors
Issue Date1973
PublisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yexmp
Citation
Experimental And Molecular Pathology, 1973, v. 18 n. 3, p. 369-379 How to Cite?
AbstractThe aim of the current study was to find out whether a combination of a balloon endothelial cell denudation procedure and cholesterol feeding would result in more rapid development of atherosclerotic lesions in the abdominal aorta of swine than if either were used alone. The results far exceeded the expectations. The two procedures appeared to act synergistically. In the first 2 or 3 mth lesions are patchy and scattered but by 6 mth they become confluent so that practically the entire abdominal aorta is covered with thick lipid rich atherosclerotic lesions. The lesions produced by 6 mth have many of the characteristics of advanced human lesions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178396
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.638
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.130
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorNam, SCen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, WMen_US
dc.contributor.authorJarmolych, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, KTen_US
dc.contributor.authorThomas, WAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:47:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:47:27Z-
dc.date.issued1973en_US
dc.identifier.citationExperimental And Molecular Pathology, 1973, v. 18 n. 3, p. 369-379en_US
dc.identifier.issn0014-4800en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178396-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of the current study was to find out whether a combination of a balloon endothelial cell denudation procedure and cholesterol feeding would result in more rapid development of atherosclerotic lesions in the abdominal aorta of swine than if either were used alone. The results far exceeded the expectations. The two procedures appeared to act synergistically. In the first 2 or 3 mth lesions are patchy and scattered but by 6 mth they become confluent so that practically the entire abdominal aorta is covered with thick lipid rich atherosclerotic lesions. The lesions produced by 6 mth have many of the characteristics of advanced human lesions.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademic Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/yexmpen_US
dc.relation.ispartofExperimental and Molecular Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen_US
dc.subject.meshAorta, Abdominal - Injuries - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshArteriosclerosis - Chemically Induced - Pathologyen_US
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, Dietaryen_US
dc.subject.meshDisease Models, Animalen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMicroscopyen_US
dc.subject.meshSwineen_US
dc.subject.meshTime Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshTritiumen_US
dc.titleRapid production of advanced atherosclerosis in swine by a combination of endothelial injury and cholesterol feedingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, WM: hrszlwm@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLee, WM=rp00728en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0014-4800(73)90032-4en_US
dc.identifier.pmid4708314-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0015863438en_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage369en_US
dc.identifier.epage379en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1973P842100009-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNam, SC=7402276002en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, WM=24799156600en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridJarmolych, J=6701510494en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLee, KT=8054054000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridThomas, WA=35551799800en_US

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