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Article: Challenge to Long Term Care for the Elderly: Cold Weather Impacts Institutional Population More than Community-Dwelling Population

TitleChallenge to Long Term Care for the Elderly: Cold Weather Impacts Institutional Population More than Community-Dwelling Population
Authors
KeywordsCold Weather
Elderly
Excess Winter Hospitalization
Hong Kong
Issue Date2012
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jmda
Citation
Journal Of The American Medical Directors Association, 2012, v. 13 n. 9, p. 788-793 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To examine whether cold weather affects the institutional population more than the community-dwelling population in terms of morbidity requiring hospital admission. Methods: Residence-based hospital discharge data were used to compile excess winter hospitalization (EWH) index for the older population (aged 65 years and above) living in institutions (residential care home for the elderly [RCHE] population) and the community-dwelling elderly population in Hong Kong. To separate the influence of influenza on the cold-related hospital admissions, episodes because of influenza were excluded from this study. Results: In 2009, the EWH index for the RCHE population was 22.93% (95% CI: 20.80%-25.09%), which was much higher than that for the community-dwelling population (14.09%, 95% CI: 13.11%-15.08%). The EWH index was higher among RCHE population compared with community-dwelling population across different age groups and sex (paired t-test one-tailed P = .014). Conclusion: The institutional elderly population was more vulnerable to the risk of excess hospitalization in winter. There may be room for improvement in the living environment of institutions, in particular the ambient temperature and personal care, to reduce hospital admissions. Given the expanding institutional population, the limited hospital beds, and long waiting queue for accident and emergency services, prevention of cold-related hospitalization would help to reduce the medical care burden. © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178319
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 6.616
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.551
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChau, PHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, Men_US
dc.contributor.authorWoo, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:45:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:45:15Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of The American Medical Directors Association, 2012, v. 13 n. 9, p. 788-793en_US
dc.identifier.issn1525-8610en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178319-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To examine whether cold weather affects the institutional population more than the community-dwelling population in terms of morbidity requiring hospital admission. Methods: Residence-based hospital discharge data were used to compile excess winter hospitalization (EWH) index for the older population (aged 65 years and above) living in institutions (residential care home for the elderly [RCHE] population) and the community-dwelling elderly population in Hong Kong. To separate the influence of influenza on the cold-related hospital admissions, episodes because of influenza were excluded from this study. Results: In 2009, the EWH index for the RCHE population was 22.93% (95% CI: 20.80%-25.09%), which was much higher than that for the community-dwelling population (14.09%, 95% CI: 13.11%-15.08%). The EWH index was higher among RCHE population compared with community-dwelling population across different age groups and sex (paired t-test one-tailed P = .014). Conclusion: The institutional elderly population was more vulnerable to the risk of excess hospitalization in winter. There may be room for improvement in the living environment of institutions, in particular the ambient temperature and personal care, to reduce hospital admissions. Given the expanding institutional population, the limited hospital beds, and long waiting queue for accident and emergency services, prevention of cold-related hospitalization would help to reduce the medical care burden. © 2012 American Medical Directors Association, Inc.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/jmdaen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of the American Medical Directors Associationen_US
dc.subjectCold Weatheren_US
dc.subjectElderlyen_US
dc.subjectExcess Winter Hospitalizationen_US
dc.subjectHong Kongen_US
dc.titleChallenge to Long Term Care for the Elderly: Cold Weather Impacts Institutional Population More than Community-Dwelling Populationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChau, PH: phpchau@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChau, PH=rp00574en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jamda.2012.08.007en_US
dc.identifier.pmid22985623-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84868360799en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros212865-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84868360799&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue9en_US
dc.identifier.spage788en_US
dc.identifier.epage793en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000310639300008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChau, PH=7102266397en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, M=25959754000en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWoo, J=36040369400en_US

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