File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Exposure temperature, but not donor age, is a confounding factor for in vitro translocation production by chronic irradiation

TitleExposure temperature, but not donor age, is a confounding factor for in vitro translocation production by chronic irradiation
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09553002.asp
Citation
International Journal Of Radiation Biology, 1999, v. 75 n. 6, p. 673-680 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To assess the effects of incubation temperature during irradiation, and of donor age, on the in vitro induction of chromosomal translocations in human lymphocytes. Material and methods: Lymphocytes from six human male donors were scored, using fluorescence in situ hybridization, for the presence of chromosomal translocations involving chromosomes 1 to 6 after in vitro, chronic exposure (delivered continuously over 48 h at 37°C or at 20°C) to tritium β-rays or 60Co γ-rays. Results: No age-related difference in the alpha coefficients of the fitted induction curves was observed for γ-ray-exposed lymphocytes obtained from four donors whose ages ranged from 24 to 79 years, or for tritium β-ray-exposed lymphocytes from two donors aged 36 and 62 years. Duplicate samples from one donor, irradiated concurrently at 20°C or 37°C, gave significantly different alpha coefficients: 0.128 ± 0.008 and 0.053 ± 0.004, respectively (p < 0.0001). The S-ratio (the ratio of induced complete to incomplete translocations) was found to be independent of radiation dose, donor age and exposure temperature. Conclusions: For biodosimetry in chronic irradiation situations, the use of alpha coefficients derived from the dose-response curves of cells chronically irradiated in vitro at body temperature is recommended. With respect to induction rates, donor age does not appear to be a confounding factor. The S-ratio is independent of radiation doses, exposure temperatures, or donor ages.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178262
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.779
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.734
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLucas, JNen_US
dc.contributor.authorDeng, Wen_US
dc.contributor.authorHsieh, WAen_US
dc.contributor.authorGalvan, Nen_US
dc.contributor.authorGale, KLen_US
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, DPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:44:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:44:51Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Radiation Biology, 1999, v. 75 n. 6, p. 673-680en_US
dc.identifier.issn0955-3002en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178262-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To assess the effects of incubation temperature during irradiation, and of donor age, on the in vitro induction of chromosomal translocations in human lymphocytes. Material and methods: Lymphocytes from six human male donors were scored, using fluorescence in situ hybridization, for the presence of chromosomal translocations involving chromosomes 1 to 6 after in vitro, chronic exposure (delivered continuously over 48 h at 37°C or at 20°C) to tritium β-rays or 60Co γ-rays. Results: No age-related difference in the alpha coefficients of the fitted induction curves was observed for γ-ray-exposed lymphocytes obtained from four donors whose ages ranged from 24 to 79 years, or for tritium β-ray-exposed lymphocytes from two donors aged 36 and 62 years. Duplicate samples from one donor, irradiated concurrently at 20°C or 37°C, gave significantly different alpha coefficients: 0.128 ± 0.008 and 0.053 ± 0.004, respectively (p < 0.0001). The S-ratio (the ratio of induced complete to incomplete translocations) was found to be independent of radiation dose, donor age and exposure temperature. Conclusions: For biodosimetry in chronic irradiation situations, the use of alpha coefficients derived from the dose-response curves of cells chronically irradiated in vitro at body temperature is recommended. With respect to induction rates, donor age does not appear to be a confounding factor. The S-ratio is independent of radiation doses, exposure temperatures, or donor ages.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInforma Healthcare. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/09553002.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Radiation Biologyen_US
dc.subject.meshAdulten_US
dc.subject.meshAge Factorsen_US
dc.subject.meshAgeden_US
dc.subject.meshDna Damageen_US
dc.subject.meshDna Repairen_US
dc.subject.meshDose-Response Relationship, Radiationen_US
dc.subject.meshHumansen_US
dc.subject.meshLymphocytes - Radiation Effects - Ultrastructureen_US
dc.subject.meshMaleen_US
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden_US
dc.subject.meshRelative Biological Effectivenessen_US
dc.subject.meshTemperatureen_US
dc.subject.meshTranslocation, Genetic - Radiation Effectsen_US
dc.titleExposure temperature, but not donor age, is a confounding factor for in vitro translocation production by chronic irradiationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailDeng, W: wdeng@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityDeng, W=rp01640en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/095530099140005en_US
dc.identifier.pmid10404996-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033053561en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033053561&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume75en_US
dc.identifier.issue6en_US
dc.identifier.spage673en_US
dc.identifier.epage680en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLucas, JN=7402441937en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDeng, W=7202223673en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHsieh, WA=7203083198en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGalvan, N=55293870700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGale, KL=35510051700en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMorrison, DP=7402118438en_US

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats