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Article: A study of the attentional changes accompanying orienting to different types of change stimuli

TitleA study of the attentional changes accompanying orienting to different types of change stimuli
Authors
Issue Date1986
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/actpsy
Citation
Acta Psychologica, 1986, v. 61 n. 2, p. 153-166 How to Cite?
AbstractThe effects of the orienting response on subsequent motor response efficiency were studied. Subjects underwent a standard habituation series of fifteen trials. On the sixteenth trial, they received one of four stimuli each of which was followed by a reaction time (RT) task: (a) same stimulus as the habituation stimulus, (b) slide of the word 'COMING' which subjects had been forewarned would precede the reaction time task, (c) subject's own name, (d) innocuous change stimulus. The results showed that RT was generally slowed in the stimulus-related change conditions compared with the no change condition, indicating that orienting to a novel or significant stimulus does not result in a generalized alerting or arousal. While skin conductance and heart rate data show no difference between the various change trial conditions, digital pulse amplitude changes, particularly later in the processing of the stimulus complex, differentiated these conditions. The data elucidate the information processing changes that accompany orienting. The significance and theoretical implications of the data are discussed. © 1986.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178156
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.816
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.365

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorShek, DTLen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpinks, JAen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:43:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:43:07Z-
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.identifier.citationActa Psychologica, 1986, v. 61 n. 2, p. 153-166en_US
dc.identifier.issn0001-6918en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/178156-
dc.description.abstractThe effects of the orienting response on subsequent motor response efficiency were studied. Subjects underwent a standard habituation series of fifteen trials. On the sixteenth trial, they received one of four stimuli each of which was followed by a reaction time (RT) task: (a) same stimulus as the habituation stimulus, (b) slide of the word 'COMING' which subjects had been forewarned would precede the reaction time task, (c) subject's own name, (d) innocuous change stimulus. The results showed that RT was generally slowed in the stimulus-related change conditions compared with the no change condition, indicating that orienting to a novel or significant stimulus does not result in a generalized alerting or arousal. While skin conductance and heart rate data show no difference between the various change trial conditions, digital pulse amplitude changes, particularly later in the processing of the stimulus complex, differentiated these conditions. The data elucidate the information processing changes that accompany orienting. The significance and theoretical implications of the data are discussed. © 1986.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/actpsyen_US
dc.relation.ispartofActa Psychologicaen_US
dc.titleA study of the attentional changes accompanying orienting to different types of change stimulien_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSpinks, JA: spinks@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySpinks, JA=rp00063en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/0001-6918(86)90028-4-
dc.identifier.pmid3716853-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0022661294en_US
dc.identifier.volume61en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage153en_US
dc.identifier.epage166en_US
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridShek, DTL=7005710405en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSpinks, JA=6701628658en_US

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