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Article: Comparing apples with apples: The importance of element wording in grid applications

TitleComparing apples with apples: The importance of element wording in grid applications
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherTaylor & Francis Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/tf/10720537.asp
Citation
Journal Of Constructivist Psychology, 2002, v. 15 n. 2, p. 109-119 How to Cite?
AbstractElements form a key component of all repertory grid applications. Outside of the clinical context, the majority of applied research still relies on conventional role titles, objects, events, and situation elements for construct elicitation, limiting alternative applications of the technique. This article draws attention to a neglected topic in the grid literature by addressing the importance of element form and wording when eliciting personal constructs. In particular, no discussion to date has addressed the type of elements needed for more complex managerial and organizational phenomena, such as eliciting cognitive perceptions of a system of something (which, in the true sense of the word, may include people, objects, activities and events). The authors propose the use of more heterogeneous elements that would signify a more meaningful range of representativeness of the domain of interest. Once this is established, the elements would need to be reworded into "-ing" words to ensure triadic comparison are comparing like with like. The use of system elements opens up new applications of Kelly's (1955) grid technique.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177898
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.333
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.249
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWright, RPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, SSKen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:40:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:40:45Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Constructivist Psychology, 2002, v. 15 n. 2, p. 109-119en_US
dc.identifier.issn1072-0537en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177898-
dc.description.abstractElements form a key component of all repertory grid applications. Outside of the clinical context, the majority of applied research still relies on conventional role titles, objects, events, and situation elements for construct elicitation, limiting alternative applications of the technique. This article draws attention to a neglected topic in the grid literature by addressing the importance of element form and wording when eliciting personal constructs. In particular, no discussion to date has addressed the type of elements needed for more complex managerial and organizational phenomena, such as eliciting cognitive perceptions of a system of something (which, in the true sense of the word, may include people, objects, activities and events). The authors propose the use of more heterogeneous elements that would signify a more meaningful range of representativeness of the domain of interest. Once this is established, the elements would need to be reworded into "-ing" words to ensure triadic comparison are comparing like with like. The use of system elements opens up new applications of Kelly's (1955) grid technique.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/tf/10720537.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Constructivist Psychologyen_US
dc.titleComparing apples with apples: The importance of element wording in grid applicationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, SSK: simonlam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, SSK=rp01071en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10720530252808692en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036554543en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros68832-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036554543&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume15en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage109en_US
dc.identifier.epage119en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000174139900003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWright, RP=9639367100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLam, SSK=35218940100en_US

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