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Article: Absence makes the mind grow sharper: Effects of element omission on subsequent recall

TitleAbsence makes the mind grow sharper: Effects of element omission on subsequent recall
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherAmerican Marketing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.marketingpower.com/AboutAMA/Pages/AMA%20Publications/AMA%20Journals/Journal%20of%20Marketing%20Research/JournalofMarketingResearch.aspx
Citation
Journal Of Marketing Research, 2002, v. 39 n. 2, p. 186-201 How to Cite?
AbstractThe authors investigate the memorial consequences of deliberately omitting crucial elements from an advertisement. Research on the self-generation effect in cognitive psychology indicates that such element omission may actually lead to an improvement in recall. Support for this perspective is obtained in a series of experiments that explores the effects of feature omission in the context of both overt omission (in which the omission is highlighted by the advertiser) and implicit omission (in which the omission, though not highlighted in the advertisement, is noticed because of prior expectations for that ad type). Even under highly constrained processing conditions (e.g., exposure times as short as four seconds), an advertisement that omits a key element is shown to produce better recall than an equivalent advertisement that contains the element. The authors find that this recall improvement occurs along dimensions that are specifically related to the omitted element; therefore, leaving out an element related only to the product category (but not the brand) produces an improvement only in category recall, whereas brand recall is improved by the omission of an element related to the brand name. The authors discuss theoretical and managerial implications of these findings.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177894
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.109
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.764
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSengupta, Jen_US
dc.contributor.authorGorn, GJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:40:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:40:44Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Marketing Research, 2002, v. 39 n. 2, p. 186-201en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-2437en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177894-
dc.description.abstractThe authors investigate the memorial consequences of deliberately omitting crucial elements from an advertisement. Research on the self-generation effect in cognitive psychology indicates that such element omission may actually lead to an improvement in recall. Support for this perspective is obtained in a series of experiments that explores the effects of feature omission in the context of both overt omission (in which the omission is highlighted by the advertiser) and implicit omission (in which the omission, though not highlighted in the advertisement, is noticed because of prior expectations for that ad type). Even under highly constrained processing conditions (e.g., exposure times as short as four seconds), an advertisement that omits a key element is shown to produce better recall than an equivalent advertisement that contains the element. The authors find that this recall improvement occurs along dimensions that are specifically related to the omitted element; therefore, leaving out an element related only to the product category (but not the brand) produces an improvement only in category recall, whereas brand recall is improved by the omission of an element related to the brand name. The authors discuss theoretical and managerial implications of these findings.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Marketing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.marketingpower.com/AboutAMA/Pages/AMA%20Publications/AMA%20Journals/Journal%20of%20Marketing%20Research/JournalofMarketingResearch.aspxen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Marketing Researchen_US
dc.titleAbsence makes the mind grow sharper: Effects of element omission on subsequent recallen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGorn, GJ: gorn@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGorn, GJ=rp01063en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1509/jmkr.39.2.186.19082en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0035995541en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0035995541&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume39en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage186en_US
dc.identifier.epage201en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000175515500004-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSengupta, J=7103058663en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGorn, GJ=6603382918en_US

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