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Article: The use of visual mental imagery in new product design

TitleThe use of visual mental imagery in new product design
Authors
Issue Date1999
PublisherAmerican Marketing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.marketingpower.com/AboutAMA/Pages/AMA%20Publications/AMA%20Journals/Journal%20of%20Marketing%20Research/JournalofMarketingResearch.aspx
Citation
Journal Of Marketing Research, 1999, v. 36 n. 1, p. 18-28 How to Cite?
AbstractIn this research, the authors seek to advance the understanding of how marketing can facilitate the new product design process. They focus on how designers' use of a specific cognitive process, visual mental imagery, can influence the customer appeal of a design. The authors present a conceptual framework for examining how visual imagery might influence the customer appeal of a design output. This is followed by two experiments that test the hypotheses that flow from the proposed model. The experiments manipulate the type of visual imagery used and the incorporation of the customer in the imagery invoked and then examine its effects on the usefulness, originality, and customer appeal of the resulting design. Consistent with the framework and the proposed hypotheses, the findings show that including the customer in imagination visual imagery during the design process has a greater effect on the usefulness of the design produced than including the customer in memory visual imagery. The results also show that imagery based on imagination results in more original designs than imagery based on memory. Most important, the use of bounded imagination, which results from the incorporation of the visual images of the customer in imagination imagery, leads to the creation of designs that are more appealing to the customer. The findings are integrated into a discussion that clarifies the role of visual imagery in design and underscores the potential of this cognitive tool in the new product design process.
DescriptionPreviously a thesis, see link: https://circle.ubc.ca/bitstream/handle/2429/9478/ubc_1998-345467.pdf?sequence=1
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177877
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 3.109
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 5.764
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDahl, DWen_US
dc.contributor.authorChattopadhyay, Aen_US
dc.contributor.authorGorn, GJen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:40:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:40:40Z-
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Marketing Research, 1999, v. 36 n. 1, p. 18-28en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-2437en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177877-
dc.descriptionPreviously a thesis, see link: https://circle.ubc.ca/bitstream/handle/2429/9478/ubc_1998-345467.pdf?sequence=1-
dc.description.abstractIn this research, the authors seek to advance the understanding of how marketing can facilitate the new product design process. They focus on how designers' use of a specific cognitive process, visual mental imagery, can influence the customer appeal of a design. The authors present a conceptual framework for examining how visual imagery might influence the customer appeal of a design output. This is followed by two experiments that test the hypotheses that flow from the proposed model. The experiments manipulate the type of visual imagery used and the incorporation of the customer in the imagery invoked and then examine its effects on the usefulness, originality, and customer appeal of the resulting design. Consistent with the framework and the proposed hypotheses, the findings show that including the customer in imagination visual imagery during the design process has a greater effect on the usefulness of the design produced than including the customer in memory visual imagery. The results also show that imagery based on imagination results in more original designs than imagery based on memory. Most important, the use of bounded imagination, which results from the incorporation of the visual images of the customer in imagination imagery, leads to the creation of designs that are more appealing to the customer. The findings are integrated into a discussion that clarifies the role of visual imagery in design and underscores the potential of this cognitive tool in the new product design process.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Marketing Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.marketingpower.com/AboutAMA/Pages/AMA%20Publications/AMA%20Journals/Journal%20of%20Marketing%20Research/JournalofMarketingResearch.aspxen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Marketing Researchen_US
dc.titleThe use of visual mental imagery in new product designen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailGorn, GJ: gorn@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityGorn, GJ=rp01063en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.2307/3151912-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0033477615en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0033477615&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume36en_US
dc.identifier.issue1en_US
dc.identifier.spage18en_US
dc.identifier.epage28en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Statesen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridDahl, DW=7102695662en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChattopadhyay, A=7202920671en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGorn, GJ=6603382918en_US

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