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Article: The influence of role conflict and self-interest on lying in organizations

TitleThe influence of role conflict and self-interest on lying in organizations
Authors
Issue Date1994
PublisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0167-4544
Citation
Journal Of Business Ethics, 1994, v. 13 n. 4, p. 295-303 How to Cite?
AbstractThe self-interest paradigm predicts that unethical behavior occurs when such behavior benefits the actor. A recent model of lying behavior, however, predicts that lying behavior results from an individual's inability to meet conflicting role demands. The need to reconcile the self-interest and role conflict theories prompted the present study, which orthogonally manipulated the benefit from lying and the conflicting role demands. A model integrating the two theories predicts the results, which showed that both elements - self benefit and role conflict - influenced lying, separately and interactively. Additionally, the relative strength of the roles in conflict affected their level of influence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. © 1994 Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177813
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.837
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.358
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGrover, SLen_US
dc.contributor.authorHui, Cen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:40:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:40:25Z-
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Business Ethics, 1994, v. 13 n. 4, p. 295-303en_US
dc.identifier.issn0167-4544en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177813-
dc.description.abstractThe self-interest paradigm predicts that unethical behavior occurs when such behavior benefits the actor. A recent model of lying behavior, however, predicts that lying behavior results from an individual's inability to meet conflicting role demands. The need to reconcile the self-interest and role conflict theories prompted the present study, which orthogonally manipulated the benefit from lying and the conflicting role demands. A model integrating the two theories predicts the results, which showed that both elements - self benefit and role conflict - influenced lying, separately and interactively. Additionally, the relative strength of the roles in conflict affected their level of influence. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed. © 1994 Kluwer Academic Publishers.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherSpringer Verlag Dordrecht. The Journal's web site is located at http://springerlink.metapress.com/openurl.asp?genre=journal&issn=0167-4544en_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Business Ethicsen_US
dc.titleThe influence of role conflict and self-interest on lying in organizationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailHui, C: chunhui@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityHui, C=rp01069en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/BF00871676en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0000894712en_US
dc.identifier.volume13en_US
dc.identifier.issue4en_US
dc.identifier.spage295en_US
dc.identifier.epage303en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1994NJ47500007-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGrover, SL=7203009092en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridHui, C=7202876939en_US

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