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Article: Social Security and elderly labor supply: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study

TitleSocial Security and elderly labor supply: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Study
Authors
KeywordsLabor Supply
Notch Cohorts
Social Security
Issue Date2011
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labeco
Citation
Labour Economics, 2011, v. 18 n. 5, p. 676-686 How to Cite?
AbstractThis study uses panel data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to estimate the effects of Social Security income on elderly labor supply in the 1990s and early 2000s. The identification strategy takes advantage of the 1977 amendments to the Social Security Act, which led to a large, unanticipated reduction in Social Security benefits for those born after January 1, 1917. Despite the advanced age of the notch cohorts, there is a significant, negative and surprisingly elastic relationship between Social Security income and hours of work. This suggests that currently proposed reductions in benefits would induce Social Security recipients to work more hours in retirement, even through their 70s and early 80s. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177789
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.899
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.127
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVere, JPen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:39:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:39:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationLabour Economics, 2011, v. 18 n. 5, p. 676-686en_US
dc.identifier.issn0927-5371en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177789-
dc.description.abstractThis study uses panel data from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) to estimate the effects of Social Security income on elderly labor supply in the 1990s and early 2000s. The identification strategy takes advantage of the 1977 amendments to the Social Security Act, which led to a large, unanticipated reduction in Social Security benefits for those born after January 1, 1917. Despite the advanced age of the notch cohorts, there is a significant, negative and surprisingly elastic relationship between Social Security income and hours of work. This suggests that currently proposed reductions in benefits would induce Social Security recipients to work more hours in retirement, even through their 70s and early 80s. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/labecoen_US
dc.relation.ispartofLabour Economicsen_US
dc.subjectLabor Supplyen_US
dc.subjectNotch Cohortsen_US
dc.subjectSocial Securityen_US
dc.titleSocial Security and elderly labor supply: Evidence from the Health and Retirement Studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailVere, JP: jpvere@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityVere, JP=rp01104en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.labeco.2011.02.001en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-80052259934en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros194848-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-80052259934&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume18en_US
dc.identifier.issue5en_US
dc.identifier.spage676en_US
dc.identifier.epage686en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000295314600009-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridVere, JP=23487024400en_US
dc.identifier.citeulike8887041-

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