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Article: From propaganda to hegemony: Jiaodian Fangtan and China's media policy

TitleFrom propaganda to hegemony: Jiaodian Fangtan and China's media policy
Authors
Issue Date2002
PublisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/10670564.asp
Citation
Journal Of Contemporary China, 2002, v. 11 n. 30, p. 35-51 How to Cite?
AbstractThis paper reports the findings of an empirical study of the current affairs program Jiaodian Fangtan, which attracts a daily audience of 300 million. A content analysis of the transcripts of all reports of this program in 1999 shows that although the program is indeed unconventional in its criticism of local cadres, it remains conservative in its subtle and cautious control of the frequency, timing, level, and content of the criticism. Further analysis of the government's media policy shows that in the 1990s, it redefined the primary role of media as agenda-setting, which allows the expression of the people's voice, though priority is still given to the party's voice. To this extent, China's media policy gradually shifted away from propaganda and towards hegemony before the turn of the century.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177692
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.933
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.730
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, Aen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:39:33Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:39:33Z-
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Contemporary China, 2002, v. 11 n. 30, p. 35-51en_US
dc.identifier.issn1067-0564en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177692-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports the findings of an empirical study of the current affairs program Jiaodian Fangtan, which attracts a daily audience of 300 million. A content analysis of the transcripts of all reports of this program in 1999 shows that although the program is indeed unconventional in its criticism of local cadres, it remains conservative in its subtle and cautious control of the frequency, timing, level, and content of the criticism. Further analysis of the government's media policy shows that in the 1990s, it redefined the primary role of media as agenda-setting, which allows the expression of the people's voice, though priority is still given to the party's voice. To this extent, China's media policy gradually shifted away from propaganda and towards hegemony before the turn of the century.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherRoutledge. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/10670564.aspen_US
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Contemporary Chinaen_US
dc.titleFrom propaganda to hegemony: Jiaodian Fangtan and China's media policyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, A: awhchan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChan, A=rp01043en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10670560120091138en_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0036140445en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0036140445&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume11en_US
dc.identifier.issue30en_US
dc.identifier.spage35en_US
dc.identifier.epage51en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, A=37019602700en_US

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