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Article: Population growth and economic growth: A reconsideration

TitlePopulation growth and economic growth: A reconsideration
Authors
Issue Date1996
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet
Citation
Economics Letters, 1996, v. 52 n. 3, p. 319-324 How to Cite?
AbstractIn an endogenous growth model with endogenous fertility, a neo-Malthusian relation emerges only when all exogenous variables are controlled for. This suggests that conflicting findings in the literature may originate from heterogeneity in unobserved variables in cross-country panel data sets. | The relationship between population growth and development has long been a controversial topic in the economic development literature. Early work by Hoover and Coale and more recent work by Blanchet suggest that high fertility suppresses per capita income growth. However, recent work by Kelley and Srinivasan are ambivalent about such a neo-Malthusian relationship between population growth and economic growth. The authors examine these conflicting positions. They emphasize that the rates of both population growth and income growth are endogenous variables within a general equilibrium framework. An endogenous growth model with endogenous fertility is then developed. It is found that when all exogenous variables are controlled for, there exists an inverse relation between population growth and economic growth. However, when some exogenous factors change, such as an improvement in technological progress, the relation becomes ambiguous. This suggests that the conflicting findings in the literature may be because of the presence of substantial heterogeneity in unobserved variables across countries and over time in cross-country panel data sets.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177657
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.603
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.612
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYip, CKen_US
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Jen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:39:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:39:27Z-
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.identifier.citationEconomics Letters, 1996, v. 52 n. 3, p. 319-324en_US
dc.identifier.issn0165-1765en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177657-
dc.description.abstractIn an endogenous growth model with endogenous fertility, a neo-Malthusian relation emerges only when all exogenous variables are controlled for. This suggests that conflicting findings in the literature may originate from heterogeneity in unobserved variables in cross-country panel data sets. | The relationship between population growth and development has long been a controversial topic in the economic development literature. Early work by Hoover and Coale and more recent work by Blanchet suggest that high fertility suppresses per capita income growth. However, recent work by Kelley and Srinivasan are ambivalent about such a neo-Malthusian relationship between population growth and economic growth. The authors examine these conflicting positions. They emphasize that the rates of both population growth and income growth are endogenous variables within a general equilibrium framework. An endogenous growth model with endogenous fertility is then developed. It is found that when all exogenous variables are controlled for, there exists an inverse relation between population growth and economic growth. However, when some exogenous factors change, such as an improvement in technological progress, the relation becomes ambiguous. This suggests that the conflicting findings in the literature may be because of the presence of substantial heterogeneity in unobserved variables across countries and over time in cross-country panel data sets.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecoleten_US
dc.relation.ispartofEconomics Lettersen_US
dc.subject.meshDemographyen_US
dc.subject.meshEconomicsen_US
dc.subject.meshModels, Theoreticalen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulationen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Dynamicsen_US
dc.subject.meshPopulation Growthen_US
dc.titlePopulation growth and economic growth: A reconsiderationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZhang, J: jjzhang@econ.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, J=rp01124en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0165-1765(96)00876-2en_US
dc.identifier.pmid12347631-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0030222533en_US
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0030222533&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume52en_US
dc.identifier.issue3en_US
dc.identifier.spage319en_US
dc.identifier.epage324en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:A1996VY25700017-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlandsen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYip, CK=7101665533en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZhang, J=55367373100en_US

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