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Article: "You have to be adaptable, obviously": Constructing professional identities in multicultural workplaces in Hong Kong

Title"You have to be adaptable, obviously": Constructing professional identities in multicultural workplaces in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsCultural Identity
Hong Kong
Multicultural Workplaces
Professional Identity
Shared Decision Making
Social Constructionism
Work-Life Balance
Issue Date2012
PublisherInternational Pragmatics Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ipra.be
Citation
Pragmatics, 2012, v. 22 n. 2, p. 279-300 How to Cite?
AbstractIn spite of the increasing globalisation of the work domain and the mobilization of the workforce (Wong et al. 2007) only very little attention has been paid to the interplay between culture and professional identities in workplace contexts. This paper addresses this gap by exploring some of the ways through which professionals are required to construct and negotiate their various identities in increasingly multicultural contexts where notions of culture may become particularly salient. We focus on multicultural workplaces where, we believe, the intricate and complex relationship between culture and identity is particularly well reflected: In these contexts members are on a daily basis exposed to culture-specific perceptions, assumptions, expectations, and practices which may ultimately be reflected in workplace communication, and which impact on how professional identities are constructed. Drawing on a corpus of more than 80 hours of authentic workplace discourse and follow-up interviews conducted with professionals we explore how expatriates who work in Hong Kong with a team of local Chinese construct, negotiate and combine aspects of their professional and cultural identities in their workplace discourse. Our particular focus is on two issues that have been identified in participants' interviews: Sharing decision making responsibilities and negotiating a work-life balance. Our analysis of these two aspects illustrates the complex processes of identity construction from two different but complementary perspectives: i) the ways in which participants portray themselves as adapting to, negotiating or rejecting the new culture in which they work and live; and ii) the ways in which these perceived identity construction processes are actually reflected in participants' workplace discourse.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177621
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 0.393
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.360
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSchnurr, Sen_US
dc.contributor.authorZayts, Oen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:37:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:37:59Z-
dc.date.issued2012en_US
dc.identifier.citationPragmatics, 2012, v. 22 n. 2, p. 279-300en_US
dc.identifier.issn1018-2101en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177621-
dc.description.abstractIn spite of the increasing globalisation of the work domain and the mobilization of the workforce (Wong et al. 2007) only very little attention has been paid to the interplay between culture and professional identities in workplace contexts. This paper addresses this gap by exploring some of the ways through which professionals are required to construct and negotiate their various identities in increasingly multicultural contexts where notions of culture may become particularly salient. We focus on multicultural workplaces where, we believe, the intricate and complex relationship between culture and identity is particularly well reflected: In these contexts members are on a daily basis exposed to culture-specific perceptions, assumptions, expectations, and practices which may ultimately be reflected in workplace communication, and which impact on how professional identities are constructed. Drawing on a corpus of more than 80 hours of authentic workplace discourse and follow-up interviews conducted with professionals we explore how expatriates who work in Hong Kong with a team of local Chinese construct, negotiate and combine aspects of their professional and cultural identities in their workplace discourse. Our particular focus is on two issues that have been identified in participants' interviews: Sharing decision making responsibilities and negotiating a work-life balance. Our analysis of these two aspects illustrates the complex processes of identity construction from two different but complementary perspectives: i) the ways in which participants portray themselves as adapting to, negotiating or rejecting the new culture in which they work and live; and ii) the ways in which these perceived identity construction processes are actually reflected in participants' workplace discourse.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherInternational Pragmatics Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ipra.been_US
dc.relation.ispartofPragmaticsen_US
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.subjectCultural Identityen_US
dc.subjectHong Kongen_US
dc.subjectMulticultural Workplacesen_US
dc.subjectProfessional Identityen_US
dc.subjectShared Decision Makingen_US
dc.subjectSocial Constructionismen_US
dc.subjectWork-Life Balanceen_US
dc.title"You have to be adaptable, obviously": Constructing professional identities in multicultural workplaces in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailZayts, O: zayts@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityZayts, O=rp01211en_US
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84862645110en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros195727-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-84862645110&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume22en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage279en_US
dc.identifier.epage300en_US
dc.publisher.placeBelgiumen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSchnurr, S=13604767100en_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridZayts, O=35770053700en_US

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