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Article: Travels in globality: Pico Iyer and Jan Morris in Hong Kong

TitleTravels in globality: Pico Iyer and Jan Morris in Hong Kong
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherThe White Horse Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.erica.demon.co.uk/STW.html
Citation
Studies In Travel Writing, 2004, v. 8 n. 2, p. 179-197 How to Cite?
AbstractHong Kong is a postcolonial city and a postmodern city, its present shape (or lack of it) the result of foreshortened historical processes. In little more than 150 years, it has been subject to colonialism, occupation, migrations and globalisation. Its new masters in China are, in one of history's great about-turns, in the thrall of multi-national capitalism. Writing about a city where history is so much 'in-the-making' is bound to be challenging, the results uncertain. This essay contrasts works by Jan Morris, who suggests that colonial history and values prevail among Hong Kong's institutions and middle-classes, and Pico Iyer, who finds the colonial past redundant in an amorphous postmodern city. Where the travel writers are coming from, literally and metaphorically, is crucial here, as they both project their existential unease onto their representations of the city. © 2004 The White Horse Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177605
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.111
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSmethurst, Pen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-19T09:37:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-19T09:37:57Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.identifier.citationStudies In Travel Writing, 2004, v. 8 n. 2, p. 179-197en_US
dc.identifier.issn1364-5145en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/177605-
dc.description.abstractHong Kong is a postcolonial city and a postmodern city, its present shape (or lack of it) the result of foreshortened historical processes. In little more than 150 years, it has been subject to colonialism, occupation, migrations and globalisation. Its new masters in China are, in one of history's great about-turns, in the thrall of multi-national capitalism. Writing about a city where history is so much 'in-the-making' is bound to be challenging, the results uncertain. This essay contrasts works by Jan Morris, who suggests that colonial history and values prevail among Hong Kong's institutions and middle-classes, and Pico Iyer, who finds the colonial past redundant in an amorphous postmodern city. Where the travel writers are coming from, literally and metaphorically, is crucial here, as they both project their existential unease onto their representations of the city. © 2004 The White Horse Press.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherThe White Horse Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.erica.demon.co.uk/STW.htmlen_US
dc.relation.ispartofStudies in Travel Writingen_US
dc.titleTravels in globality: Pico Iyer and Jan Morris in Hong Kongen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.emailSmethurst, P: paulsmet@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authoritySmethurst, P=rp01173en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltexten_US
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-61049275478en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros107161-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-61049275478&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_US
dc.identifier.volume8en_US
dc.identifier.issue2en_US
dc.identifier.spage179en_US
dc.identifier.epage197en_US
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_US
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridSmethurst, P=36819444100en_US

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